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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Donald Trump is now threatening that he might not show up at Thursday’s Republican debate on Fox News, as a result of Fox anchor and debate co-moderator Megyn Kelly allegedly being nasty to him. And in the true fashion of a pro-wrestling “heel” character, he is doing this with a series of vicious personal attacks on Kelly herself — which itself seems like a hint that he might simply be drumming up more ratings for a debate he will indeed attend.

Notably, Trump made this threat in an interview on one of Fox’s competitors — CNN, where he sat down with Wolf Blitzer.

“I mean, I don’t like her. She doesn’t treat me fairly, I’m not a big fan of hers at all. I don’t care, she probably was — I might be the best thing that ever happened to her. Whoever even heard of her before the last debate? But I thought she was very unfair in the last debate. A lot of people said I won that debate — everybody said I won the last debate.

He added: “But I’m not a fan of Megyn Kelly, I don’t like her — she probably doesn’t like me, and that’s okay. But she better be fair. I’d like to go to the debate; I enjoy the debates; I’ve done well in the debates. Every single poll has said I’ve won every debate. But we’re gonna see what happens — gonna be exciting.”

Blitzer also asked The Donald whether he had decided “100 percent” to actually go to the debate.

“They’ll see, if I think I’m going to be treated unfairly, I’ll do something else,” Trump responded. “But I don’t think she can treat me fairly actually. I think she’s very biased and I don’t think she can treat me fairly.”

At the very first Republican debate this past August, Kelly asked Trump about previous offensive comments he had publicly made about women who were adversaries of his, such as calling them “fat pigs,” “dogs,” “slobs,” and “disgusting animals.”

Soon after the debate, Trump later commented in the press about Kelly: “You could see there was blood coming out of her eyes, blood coming out of her — wherever.” The remark was widely interpreted as a remark about her menstrual cycle — a charge that he has denied. He also said during the ensuing controversy, “she asked me a very inappropriate question. She should really be apologizing to me, you want to know the truth.”

Blake Neff

Twitter screenshot

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

On July 10, CNN's Oliver Darcy reported that Blake Neff, the top writer for Tucker Carlson's prime-time Fox News show, had been anonymously posting racist, misogynistic, homophobic, and other offensive content on an online forum for five years. Neff used racist and homophobic slurs, referred to women in a derogatory manner, and pushed white supremacist content while writing for Carlson's show. Neff resigned after CNN contacted him for comment.

As Darcy reported, in an interview with the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, Neff claimed anything Carlson read during his show was initially drafted by him. Darcy also found instances where there was "some overlap between the forum and the show," as sometimes the "material Neff encountered on the forum found its way on to Carlson's show."

During a 2018 appearance on Fox's The Five to promote his book Ship of Fools, Carlson mentioned Neff by name, calling him a "wonderful writer." Carlson also included Neff in the acknowledgments of the book.


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Before joining Fox News, Neff worked at The Daily Caller, a conservative news outlet that Carlson co-founded. The outlet has published a number of white supremacists, anti-Semites, and bigots.


Carlson has a long history of promoting white supremacist content on his show. His show has featured many guests who have connections to white supremacy and far-right extremism. Carlson has regularly been praised by Neo-Nazis and various far-right extremist figures, and he's been a hero on many white supremacist podcasts. Users of the extremist online message boards 4chan and 8chan have repeatedly praised Carlson.

The manifesto released by the gunman who killed 20 people in El Paso, Texas, in 2019 was strewn with content that echoed talking points from Carlson's show. Days after the shooting, Carlson declared that calling white supremacy a serious issue is a "hoax" as it is "actually not a real problem in America."

Carlson has been hemorrhaging advertisers following his racist coverage of the Black Lives Matters movement and the recent protests against police brutality. Now that we know his top writer was using content from white supremacist online message boards for Carlson's show, it is more imperative than ever that advertisers distance their brands away from this toxicity.