The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

London (AFP) — The U.S. ambassador to Britain sparked annoyance in his host country by criticizing the local traditional food in a magazine interview this week.

Asked what he would serve at his ideal dinner party, envoy Matthew Barzun replied somewhat undiplomatically.

“I’ll tell you what I would not serve — lamb and potatoes. I must have had lamb and potatoes 180 times since I have been here. There are limits and I have reached them,” Barzun told Tatler magazine.

Commentators were quick to respond.

“When Barzun quits his post in disgrace — as he surely must, with immediate effect — angry mobs are bound to line the route to the airport, booing and pinging potatoes off his windscreen and screaming threats,” wrote Stuart Heritage in the Guardian.

The Telegraph‘s William Sitwell defended British lamb as “the finest lamb on the planet” and hit out in return at U.S. cuisine.

“Chefs, restaurateurs, farmers, retailers — indeed all British patriots — have collectively had a sharp intake of breath before spluttering profanities about how a man who comes from a land … of deep-fried chicken, cheese grits, burgoo, and spoonbread (foods simply lashed with sugar and fat) could be so disparaging about two of our most noble ingredients.”

To make matters worse, Barzun spoke before travelling to Newport to accompany U.S. president Barack Obama to the NATO summit in Wales — famed for its lamb.

AFP Photo/Ben Stansall

Interested in world news? Sign up for our daily email newsletter!

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Donald Trump

Image via Twitter

A year after former President Donald Trump left the White House and Joe Biden was sworn in as president of the United States, Trump continues to have considerable influence in the Republican Party. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, a former Trump critic turned Trump sycophant, recently told Fox News that having a “working relationship” with Trump must be a litmus test for anyone in a GOP leadership role in Congress. But an NBC News poll, conducted in January 14-18, 2022, finds that many Republican voters identify as Republicans first and Trump supporters second.

Analyzing that poll in the New York Times on January 21, reporters Leah Askarinam and Blake Hounshell, explain, “Buried in a new survey published today is a fascinating nugget that suggests the Republican Party may not be as devoted to Trump as we’ve long assumed. Roughly every month for the last several years, pollsters for NBC News have asked: ‘Do you consider yourself to be more of a supporter of Donald Trump or more of a supporter of the Republican Party?’ Over most of that time, Republicans have replied that they saw themselves as Trump supporters first.”

Keep reading... Show less

Ivanka Trump, right

Image via @Huffington Post

As House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s select committee on the January 6, 2021 insurrection moves along, it is examining Ivanka Trump’s actions that day — especially the former White House senior adviser urging her father, then- President Donald Trump, to call off his supporters when the U.S. Capitol Building was under attack. This week, Ivanka Trump’s importance to the committee is examined in a column by liberal Washington Post opinion writer Greg Sargent and an article by blogger Marcy Wheeler.

Sargent notes that the committee’s “new focus on Ivanka Trump” shows that it “is developing an unexpectedly comprehensive picture of how inextricably linked the violence was to a genuine plot to thwart a legitimately elected government from taking power.”

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}