The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

New York City (AFP) – U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi agreed Thursday on the need for a positive response by Iran in renewed nuclear talks, a U.S. official said.

“Both the U.S. and China believe that Iran should cooperate and should respond positively to the offer on the table,” the official told reporters.

Kerry later Thursday will hold one of the highest-level meetings between Iran and the U.S. since the 1979 revolution when he sits down with his Iranian counterpart Mohammad Javad Zarif for nuclear talks led by the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council and Germany.

The group, dubbed the P5+1, made a new offer to Iran earlier this year, before Rouhani’s election, on how to overcome a current stalemate in the nuclear dossier.

It is believed to have offered an easing of international sanctions which have crippled the Iranian economy, in return for a slow down of Iran’s controversial uranium enrichment program.

But the Iranian government has yet to respond fully to the offer.

Kerry and Wang met just hours before the landmark meeting of the global powers seeking to rein in Iran’s suspect nuclear program.

“On Iran they were coordinating in the run-up to today’s P5+1 meeting,” the senior State Department official said.

“They talked through the elements of the diplomatic track as well as the sanctions track.”

Kerry also asked Wang to share his impressions of the new Iranian leadership which took power in August, after recent Iranian-Chinese talks on the sidelines of a conference in Bishkek.

“The foreign minister shared a bit of his thinking with regard to the new leadership in Iran,” the U.S. official said, but refused to go into further detail.

New Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, seen as a moderate in Iranian politics, has made overtures to the West since taking office.

Photo Credit: AFP/Timothy Clary

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Donald Trump

Image via Twitter

A year after former President Donald Trump left the White House and Joe Biden was sworn in as president of the United States, Trump continues to have considerable influence in the Republican Party. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, a former Trump critic turned Trump sycophant, recently told Fox News that having a “working relationship” with Trump must be a litmus test for anyone in a GOP leadership role in Congress. But an NBC News poll, conducted in January 14-18, 2022, finds that many Republican voters identify as Republicans first and Trump supporters second.

Analyzing that poll in the New York Times on January 21, reporters Leah Askarinam and Blake Hounshell, explain, “Buried in a new survey published today is a fascinating nugget that suggests the Republican Party may not be as devoted to Trump as we’ve long assumed. Roughly every month for the last several years, pollsters for NBC News have asked: ‘Do you consider yourself to be more of a supporter of Donald Trump or more of a supporter of the Republican Party?’ Over most of that time, Republicans have replied that they saw themselves as Trump supporters first.”

Keep reading... Show less

Ivanka Trump, right

Image via @Huffington Post

As House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s select committee on the January 6, 2021 insurrection moves along, it is examining Ivanka Trump’s actions that day — especially the former White House senior adviser urging her father, then- President Donald Trump, to call off his supporters when the U.S. Capitol Building was under attack. This week, Ivanka Trump’s importance to the committee is examined in a column by liberal Washington Post opinion writer Greg Sargent and an article by blogger Marcy Wheeler.

Sargent notes that the committee’s “new focus on Ivanka Trump” shows that it “is developing an unexpectedly comprehensive picture of how inextricably linked the violence was to a genuine plot to thwart a legitimately elected government from taking power.”

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}