The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

SEOUL (AFP) – Prominent U.S. music producer Quincy Jones teamed up Thursday with a South Korean entertainment company to help promote Korea’s K-pop stars globally.

“I feel like there is a very strong connection between Korea and the U.S.,” Jones said after signing a deal with CJ E&M, one of South Korea’s biggest entertainment firms.

The deal was signed between Jones, known for producing hit songs such as “We Are the World” and “Thriller” with legendary American singer Michael Jackson, and CJ E&M’s music division chief Ahn Joon.

The deal calls on Jones and CJ E&M to promote K-pop globally and set up a joint fund which will help talented musicians study at the Berklee College of Music in the United States.

Jones will serve as executive producer in co-production with the Korean company.

“There’s is a sensibility here I have not found in Japan, China or Vietnam,” he said, citing the success of South Korean rapper Psy’s global chart-topper “Gangnam Style”.

“When I first came here last time, I felt like I was back home in Chicago. They (Koreans and Americans) have an emotional connection, musical connection, conversation connection.”

Photo Credit: AFP/Jung Yeon-Je

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Danziger Draws

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell said failure to pay US debts is 'just not something we can contemplate'

Washington (AFP) - The chairman of the US Federal Reserve called on lawmakers to raise the nation's borrowing limit urgently on Wednesday, warning that failure to pay government debts would do "severe damage" to the economy.

"It's just very important that the debt ceiling be raised in a timely fashion so the United States can pay its bills when it comes due," Jerome Powell said as the central bank concluded its September meeting. Failure to pay, he added, is "just not something we can contemplate."

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}