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Apple’s New Encryption To Lock Out Government

By Rob Lever

Washington (AFP) — Apple is rolling out new privacy protections for iPhones and iPads, with a new system that makes it impossible for the company to unlock a device even with a warrant.

Apple’s privacy terms updated late Wednesday indicate that under its new mobile operating system, iOS 8, the company will not have access to customer passwords.

“Your personal data such as photos, messages (including attachments), email, contacts, call history, iTunes content, notes, and reminders, is placed under the protection of your passcode,” says the new policy on Apple’s website.

“Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data. So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.”

The iOS 8 operating system is available on the iPhone 6, which goes on sale Friday, and can be installed on many existing iPhones and iPads.

The update comes in the wake of revelations of massive government surveillance programs that sweep up data from computers and other devices.

Leaked documents from former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden have highlighted concerns about the role of major tech firms in these programs.

Apple’s chief executive Tim Cook said the company is dedicated to protection of personal data.

“Our business model is very straightforward,” he said in a message to Apple users.

“We sell great products. We don’t build a profile based on your email content or web browsing habits to sell to advertisers. We don’t ‘monetize’ the information you store on your iPhone or in iCloud. And we don’t read your email or your messages to get information to market to you.”

The move comes with Apple and other tech firms under scrutiny for how much information is handed over to law enforcement and intelligence agencies.

Apple said it does comply with legitimate court orders and other legal requests.

But Cook stated, “We have never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services. We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will.”

The privacy update comes following a leak of nude celebrity photos from their iCloud storage. Apple said its cloud servers were not breached, but that celebrities had their passwords stolen or fell victim to schemes to give up their passwords.

– ‘Awesome for privacy’ –

Privacy activists praised the effort and said it may encourage others to follow Apple’s lead.

“This is very awesome for privacy,” said Joseph Hall, chief technologist at the Washington-based Center for Democracy and Technology.

“This is an important assurance for people. It’s not security just some of the time, it’s security all of the time.”

Hall added that the move is “good for the industry, because there is a real deficit of trust” after the incident affecting celebrity photos.

“I think with this, you will see other companies compete on privacy and security,” Hall told AFP.

Hall said that on Google Android devices, the pattern-unlock code provides little security but that an optional personal code is encrypted and offers similar protection to that offered by Apple.

“But it’s not the default for Android, and the default is important because most people don’t change that,” he said.

Marc Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, said it was “good news for Internet users and iPhone users that their screen lock cannot be compromised.”

But Rotenberg said other privacy issues still need to be addressed, notably how Apple handles personal data for its HealthKit system for fitness monitoring.

“The issue is the flow of user data to the app developers,” Rotenberg told AFP. “Apple has created a platform that can allow for the transfer of sensitive medical data.”

Jeffrey Chester at the Center for Digital Democracy also expressed caution.

Chester said Apple “did the right thing” with its new encryption but that its partnerships with banks, retailers, and others are cause for concern.

“These companies know that Apple will help them gather even more data from us, including our financial information and location,” Chester said.

“Apple at the moment is serving as a data collection ‘middleman,’ as it builds a new business as a financial and health data supplier.”

AFP Photo

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U.S. Data Sweep ‘Harms Press, Democratic Rights’

By Rob Lever

Washington (AFP) — Large-scale surveillance by the U.S. government has begun to have an impact on press freedom and broader democratic rights, a study released Monday said.

The report by the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch found that the vast surveillance efforts aimed at thwarting terrorist attacks have undermined press freedom, the public’s right to information as well as rights to legal counsel.

“The work of journalists and lawyers is central to our democracy,” said report author Alex Sinha. “When their work suffers, so do we.”

The report is based on interviews with 92 people in the United States, including journalists, lawyers, and current and former U.S. government officials. The group included 46 journalists representing a wide range of news organizations, including several Pulitzer Prize winners.

The journalists said the revelations about widespread surveillance by U.S. intelligence agencies has magnified existing concerns about a government crackdown on leaks.

In the current atmosphere, sources are more hesitant to discuss even unclassified issues of public concern, fearing a loss of security clearances, dismissal, or criminal investigation.

The report said some reporters are using elaborate techniques to avoid surveillance such as encrypted communications, use of disposable phones, or avoiding the Internet and other networks entirely.

The journalists said they feared coming under suspicion for doing their jobs.

The journalists said the increase in the U.S. government’s prosecution of officials in leak investigations prompted initial concern, which was magnified by revelations from former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden.

“It is not lost on us, or on our sources, that there have been eight criminal cases against sources (under the current administration) versus three before” — under all previous administrations combined, said Charlie Savage, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the New York Times.

Peter Maass of The Intercept said things “got worse significantly after the Snowden documents came into circulation. If you suspected the government had the capability to do mass surveillance, you found out it was certainly true.”

– Legal rights in jeopardy –

Lawyers meanwhile complained that surveillance has created concerns about their ability to build trust and develop legal strategy in a confidential environment.

Some attorneys are using techniques similar to those used by journalists to avoid leaving a digital trail.

“I’ll be damned if I have to start acting like a drug dealer in order to protect my client’s confidentiality,” said one lawyer.

The report said the rights to a free press and legal counsel are pillars of democracy which are being eroded by the mass surveillance techniques.

“The U.S. holds itself out as a model of freedom and democracy, but its own surveillance programs are threatening the values it claims to represent,” Sinha said.

The researchers interviewed 42 practicing attorneys, including criminal defense lawyers, military judge advocates, and other legal professionals.

Also interviewed were five current or former senior government officials “with knowledge of the U.S. government’s surveillance programs or related policies.”

AFP Photo/Frederick Florin

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