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Rush Limbaugh spent part of his Friday show trying to put the controversy over the reform of the filibuster in terms his audience could understand — rape:

Of course, when the Democrats respond to unprecedented obstruction by changing the rules of the Senate, Limbaugh thinks about rape.

But when Republicans threatened to do the same exact thing in 2005, he called it “the constitutional option.”

The Constitution says nothing about this. The Constitution says simple majority, 51 votes. But because they’re invoking the filibuster, which, you know, the Senate can make up its own rules but not when they impose on the Constitution and not when they impose on the legislative branch. Separation of powers here. But if nobody stops them, they’re going to keep getting away with it. It’s up to the Senate Republicans to stop them.

Now, this is Point 2. There’s a so-called “nuclear” option, which I don’t like that term. Call it the Constitutional Option. It would end the use of the filibuster for judicial nominations.

Rush clearly remembers one of the two rules he’s supposed to live by: When Republicans do it, it’s right. But he’s forgetting the second rule that the GOP has been trying to enforce since the 2012 election: Stop talking about rape.

Rush Limbaugh Rape Filibuster

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