Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Donald Trump claimed on Tuesday that his successful performance in Monday’s Iowa caucus was somehow historic, but that isn’t true. President Barack Obama outperformed Trump when he ran for reelection in 2012.

“I had the largest re-election vote in the history of that great state, by far, beating President Obama’s previous record by a lot,” Trump tweeted. “Also, 97 percent Plus of the vote! Thank you Iowa!”

The Iowa Republican Party’s official results show that Trump received 97.15 percent of the vote. Former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh received 1.08 percent of the vote on Monday night, and William Weld, a former governor of Massachusetts, received 1.31 percent of the vote. Another 0.47 percent of the vote went to “other.”

Appearing at a caucus site in Ankeny on Monday, Walsh told voters that because of Trump, the Republican Party is losing support from women, people of color, and young voters.

“If we aren’t careful, we are going to become a party of old white guys,” Walsh said.

In 2012, President Obama ran unopposed and received 98.44 percent of the vote, a higher level of support than the number Trump is touting as “the largest re-election vote in the history” of Iowa. Of the 8,152 convention delegates awarded in the Iowa caucus that year, Obama received 8,065 of them for 99 percent support, with only 87 delegates (1 percent) backing the “uncommitted” position.

Obama went on to overwhelmingly win the general election against Mitt Romney, despite the endorsement Romney received from Trump.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Mural of Ruth Bader Ginsburg near the White House in Washington, D.C.

Photo by Elvert Barnes / CC BY-SA 2.0

Reprinted with permission from DailyKos

It feels like public mourning flooded the nation when we learned that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday. People flocked to social media to share their thanks for her decades of relentless work; though she's undoubtedly a feminist icon and pioneer for women's rights and equality, Ginsburg's work did not only benefit women, but everyone. And of course, people were eager to make sure her "fervent" wish was communicated to the masses: That she "not be replaced until a new president is installed."

Keep reading... Show less