By ProPublica

How Dark Money Helped Republicans Hold the House and Hurt Voters

December 23, 2012 2:44 pm Category: Memo Pad, Politics 6 Comments A+ / A-
How Dark Money Helped Republicans Hold the House and Hurt Voters

by Olga Pierce , Justin Elliott and Theodoric MeyerProPublica

In the November election, a million more Americans voted for Democrats seeking election to the U.S. House of Representatives than Republicans. But that popular vote advantage did not result in control of the chamber. Instead, despite getting fewer votes, Republicans have maintained a commanding control of the House. Such a disparity has happened only three times in the last century.

(Here’s a chart comparing 2010 and 2012.)

Analysts and others have identified redistricting as a key to the disparity. Republicans had a years-long strategy of winning state houses in order to control each state’s once-a-decade redistricting process. (Confused about redistricting? Check out our song.)

Republican strategist Karl Rove laid out the approach in a Wall Street Journal column in early 2010 headlined “He who controls redistricting can control Congress.”

The approach paid off. In 2010 state races, Republicans picked up 675 legislative seats, gaining complete control of 12 state legislatures. As a result, the GOP oversaw redrawing of lines for four times as many congressional districts as Democrats.

How did they dominate redistricting? A ProPublica investigation has found that the GOP relied on opaque nonprofits funded by dark money, supposedly nonpartisan campaign outfits, and millions in corporate donations to achieve Republican-friendly maps throughout the country. Two tobacco giants, Altria and Reynolds, each pitched inmore than $1 million to the main Republican redistricting group, as did Rove’s super PAC, American Crossroads; Walmart and the pharmaceutical industry also contributed. Other donors, who gave to the nonprofits Republicans created, may never have to be disclosed.

While many observers have noted that mega-donors like Sheldon Adelson backed losing candidates, a close look at the Republicans’ effort on redistricting suggests something else: The hundreds of millions spent this year on presidential TV ads may not have hit the mark, but the relatively modest sums funneled to redistricting paid off handsomely.

Where Democrats were in control, they drew gerrymandered maps just like Republicans. They also had their own secretive redistricting funding. (Last year, we detailed how Democrats in California worked to undermine the state’s attempt at non-partisan redistricting.) But Democrats got outspent 3-to-1 and did not prioritize winning state legislatures. They also faced a Republican surge in 2010.

Exactly how the Republican effort worked has been shrouded in mystery until now. But depositions and other documents in a little-noticed lawsuit in North Carolina offer an exceptionally detailed picture of Republicans’ tactics.

Documents show that national Republican operatives, funded by dark money groups, drew the crucial lines that packed as many Democrats as possible into three congressional districts. The result: the state’s congressional delegation flipped from 7-6 Democratic to 9-4 in favor of Republicans. The combination of party operatives, cash and secrecy also existed in other states, including Wisconsin, Ohio and Michigan.

Redistricting is supposed to protect the fundamental principle of one-person-one-vote. As demographics change, lines are shifted to make sure everyone is equally represented and to give communities a voice. In order for Republicans to win in North Carolina, they undermined the votes of Democrats, especially African-Americans. (Party leaders in North Carolina say they were simply complying with federal voting laws.)

The strategy began in the run-up to the 2010 elections. Republicans poured money into local races in North Carolina and elsewhere. It was an efficient approach. While congressional races routinely cost millions, a few thousand dollars can swing a campaign for a seat in the state legislature

The Republican effort to influence redistricting overall was spearheaded by a group called the Republican State Leadership Committee, which has existed since 2002. For most of that time, it was primarily a vehicle for donors like health care and tobacco companies to influence state legislatures, key battlegrounds for regulations that affect corporate America. Its focus changed in 2010 when Ed Gillespie, former counselor to President George W. Bush, was named chairman. His main project: redistricting.

Soon after Gillespie took over, the RSLC announced an effort to influence state races throughout the country, the Redistricting Majority Project, or REDMAP. Fundraising soared. The group raised $30 million in 2010, by far its best year. (Its Democratic counterpart raised roughly $10 million.)

The RSLC is organized as a type of political group that can take in unlimited corporate donations. It must disclose its contributors. But that doesn’t mean it’s always possible to trace the origins of the money.

Along with Walmart and tobacco companies, the RSLC’s largest funders in 2010 were the Chamber of Commerce and American Justice Partnership, which gave a combined $6.5 million. Those two groups raise money from corporations and others but don’t have to disclose their donors.

As the 2010 North Carolina legislative elections heated up, the RSLC jumped into local races. But the way they made contributions kept their involvement away from the attention of state voters. Rather than running campaign ads under its own name, the RSLC distributed money to a newly formed local nonprofit. The RSLC declined to comment.

The RSLC gave $1.25 million to its vehicle of choice Real Jobs NC. The group calls itself a “non-partisan organization that believes we need to return to a reliance on the free enterprise system that made our country great for real answers.” It was started in 2010 and got a hefty $200,000 boost from dollar-store magnate and Republican supporter Art Pope, although Pope denies his donation was related to redistricting or REDMAP.

Real Jobs NC produced ads and mailers slamming more than 20 state Democrats.

“Steve Goss … nice guy,” intoned the voiceover in one such ad in North Carolina, attacking then-Democratic state senator Goss. “Too bad he’s voting with the Raleigh liberals over hometown conservatives.”

Pages →  1 2 3

How Dark Money Helped Republicans Hold the House and Hurt Voters Reviewed by on . by Olga Pierce , Justin Elliott and Theodoric Meyer, ProPublica In the November election, a million more Americans voted for Democrats seeking election to the U by Olga Pierce , Justin Elliott and Theodoric Meyer, ProPublica In the November election, a million more Americans voted for Democrats seeking election to the U Rating:

More by ProPublica

IRS

What Newly Released Docs Tell Us About The IRS And How It Handles Dark Money Groups

by Kim Barker and Theodoric Meyer, ProPublica. A GOP-led House committee voted Wednesday to seek criminal charges against former IRS official Lois Lerner, who used to run the IRS division in charge of tax-exempt groups. In a party-line vote, the committee accused Lerner of unfairly targeting the applications of conservative groups and misleading the office of the

Read more...

Koch brothers

Who Controls The Kochs’ Political Network? ASMI, SLAH And TOHE

by Kim Barker and Theodoric Meyer, ProPublica. Libertarian billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch were among the first to grasp the political potential of social welfare groups and trade associations — nonprofits that can spend money to influence elections but don’t have to name their donors. The Kochs and their allies have built up a

Read more...

Money 427x321

Dark Money Operative Sees Hope For Meth House Documents Go Up In Smoke

by Kim Barker, ProPublica. In a sharply worded ruling, a federal judge in Montana said Tuesday that documents found inside a Colorado meth house pointing to possible election law violations will not be returned to the couple claiming the papers were stolen from one of their cars. Instead, the thousands of pages will remain where

Read more...

Tags

Comments

  • charleo1

    It’s troubling Mr. and Mrs. Republican aren’t more concerned about who’s influencing their
    candidates. I try to remain confident that all Americans value our democracy, no matter the
    eventual winner. And the fact the money is untraceable, and could come from sources outside
    the Country. Well, who among us Americans, would be comfortable with that? Listen, our
    democracy is our responsibility, no matter how partisan our politics sometimes become.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Daniel-Jones/827014412 Daniel Jones

    Redistricting needs to be accomplished by non-party oversight.

    It’s gone beyond the curious beast Gerrymander, this is political ghetto creation.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dominick.vila.1 Dominick Vila

    Money played an important role in the elction of Tea Party members loyal to Rove, Norquist, and the puppet masters: the Koch brothers. Unfortunately, most Tea Party members in the House would have been elected, regardless of how much financial support they enjoyed, for the simple reason that they are from red states where social issues such as abortion, gay marriage, gun ownership, and the Lord are the most important considerations when voters go to the polls. Most of them will be re-elected in 2014. The only TP members that may be vulnerable in 2014 are those in blue state districts.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jim-Myers/100001512942781 Jim Myers

    AH, SLEAZE IS ALIVE AND WELL IN NORTH CAROLINA.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/HFYZP2APYPP7H6PWS2ZDQRWFEQ Hillbilly

    Tennessee was also gerrymandered. District 4 which is the district the Dr Scott De Lesiure (last name spelled wrong) when elected in 2010 had 8 counties in his district, This year his district went across the state from East Tennessee to Middle Tennessee to West Tennessee and only included counties that usually voted Republican. People in Tennessee are still trying to get an truthful reason for District 4 covering the whole state. We know why but we think the Republicans should explain why one Representative had a district that crossed the whole state and had only counties where the people voted Republican. The reason as far as we are concerned is because that was the only way the womanizer, drug using and phony pro life man could be elected, because the Counties included only voted Republican no matter what type of person the Republican candidate was. That doesn’t seem like everyone was being treated fairly in those counties and other counties the way the Republicans or their substitutes drew the district lines in Tennessee.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/RFEPMKNCBVGJYV2X7LBNDGRUEY William

    The best Government money can buy, what a great place we live in.

scroll to top