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By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times

A second American aid worker with the Ebola virus was back in the United States on Tuesday after a medical air ambulance flew her from the West African nation of Liberia to Georgia, where she will join a colleague receiving treatment for the often lethal illness.

The plane carrying Nancy Writebol landed at Dobbins Air Reserve Base outside Atlanta and was met by a specially equipped ambulance for the drive to Emory University Hospital. It was the same drill used to transport Dr. Kent Brantly, who arrived at Emory on Saturday morning.

Both of the aid workers fell ill in Liberia last week after working with others stricken in an Ebola outbreak that has claimed hundreds of lives in four African nations.

No Americans have been diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, but doctors at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City were awaiting results of tests on a man who arrived there Monday showing symptoms common to the disease, including a high fever and gastrointestinal problems. He had arrived in the past month from West Africa, officials at Mount Sinai said.

As a precaution, the man is in isolation until the test results are known, officials said.

There is no known cure for Ebola, but Brantly and Writebol both have received an experimental serum.

AFP Photo/Jessica Mcgowan

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Lara Trump

Reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

Guillermo Garcia, a soccer coach, was fundraising for his daughter's soccer team outside of an El Paso, Texas, Walmart on August 3, 2019 when a white supremacist opened fire, killing him and 22 others in what The New York Times called "the deadliest anti-Latino attack in modern American history." El Paso Police Chief Greg Allen told The Dallas Morning News that Patrick Crusius, who was 21 years old at the time, purchased a 7.62 mm caliber gun and drove some 10 hours west from Allen, Texas, to carry out the massacre.

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