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Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, left, and former President Donald Trump

Perhaps it will come as no surprise to you that despite the fact that Republican Georgia Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene rails against the COVID-19 vaccine, she doesn’t mind making money from it.

In fact, the infamously unvaccinated congresswoman holds stock in three of the major vaccine-making pharmaceutical companies—AstraZeneca, Pfizer, and Johnson & Johnson.

According to financial disclosure filings analyzed by Insider, each of Greene’s stocks are worth about $1,000 and $15,000 to $50,000 respectively as of her Aug. 14, 2020 filings.

The revelation was first reported by the Chattanooga Times Free Press.

In a November town hall, Greene claimed she wasn’t vaccinated because “the government has no business to tell Americans that they should take the COVID vaccine or not,” CNN reported.

Jennifer Strahan, a Georgia entrepreneur who announced plans to run against Greene in the 2022 Republican primary alerted the Times Free Press of Greene’s holdings.

Strahan is running on a platform of "bringing competent leadership back" to Georgia's 14th congressional district.

Strahan posted a poll on her Twitter account asking which COVID-19 vaccine manufacturers Greene owns stock in, then posted the results.

Congresswoman Greene’s office told Indy100 that she “does not handle her investments. A third-party advisor maintains her investment portfolio.”

On Sunday, Greene spoke at the Americafest conference, a far-right conservative event organized by Turning Point USA, vowing never to get vaccinated. “And they’re going to have a hell of a time if they want to hold me down and give me a vaccine,” she said.


On November 2, the representative appeared as a guest on Steve Bannon’s War Room podcast, where she said “vaccine Nazis” are “ruining our country.”

So, I guess getting the vaccine is one thing, but making money from vaccines is a totally different issue.

Greene also used her time onstage at the Americafest to call out the diversity of the attendees, the “Black people, brown people, white people, and yellow people” only to highlight that the event can’t possibly be racist.

Oh, okay. Who uses the words “yellow people?” Racists. That’s who, you QAnon-believing, anti-vaxxing, gun-toting blockhead racist.

Greene is also likely to be subpoenaed for her part in the terrorist attack on January 6 at the U.S. Capitol.

Article reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

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