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Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger
Photo by The Daily Beast/ Twitter

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

A top Georgia election official issued a searing indictment of his GOP colleagues in Washington for helping to fan the flames of Donald Trump's baseless fraud claims.

Detailing a series of death threats made against elected officials and private citizens alike following Trump's attack on the state's election results, lifelong conservative Gabriel Sterling, a top aide to Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, told reporters on Tuesday that the whole situation had gotten out of hand and someone could end up dead because of it.


"It has to stop!" Sterling implored of the threats to his boss, his boss' wife, and various other officials and private citizens caught in the crossfire. "Mr. President, you have not condemned these actions or this language. Senators, you have not condemned this language or these actions. This has to stop. We need you to step up and, if you're going to take a position of leadership, show some."

"This is elections," Sterling continued, "This is the backbone of democracy. And all of you who have not said a damn word are complicit in this. … Someone's going to get hurt, someone's going to get shot, someone's going to get killed. And it's not right."

Both of the state's GOP senators facing runoffs in January—Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue—have fully backed Trump's fraud claims.

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Photo by Village Square/ CC BY-NC 2.0

Reprinted with permission from The American Prospect

The barriers to amending the Constitution are so high that I've long thought it pointless to pursue any reform that way. But after four years of Donald Trump, I've changed my mind. In fact, I'm suffering from a bout of what Kathleen Sullivan in 1995 in these pages called "constitutional amendmentitis."

Sullivan—later dean of Stanford Law School—used the term for conservatives' feverish advocacy of amendments in the mid-1990s. The amendments would have, among other things, imposed a balanced federal budget, limited congressional terms, authorized laws banning flag-burning, given the president a line-item veto, and outlawed abortion. It was a good thing those amendments didn't receive the necessary two-thirds approval in both houses of Congress, much less ratification by three-fourths of the states.

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