The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

As America marked a milestone in our Trump ordeal, the president sat for disastrous interviews that provided fresh embarrassment to him, his supporters, and the country that is enduring him — and plenty of fresh material for his late-night nemesis Stephen Colbert.

While speaking with a pair of Reuters correspondents about North Korea and China, Trump abruptly pulled out colored maps showing counties he had won in November 2016. He had a copy for each of them — and, Colbert quips, he probably colored them himself.

“The red is obviously us,” burbled Trump. “It’s pretty good, right?”

The president’s Oval Office interview with CBS’s John Dickerson was not so good — especially when the Face the Nation anchor pressed Trump on whether he stands by his bogus “wiretap” claims against President Obama. “I don’t stand by anything!” barked the president, ending the interview abruptly moments later, when he plopped himself down at his desk to sulk.

Watching his friend Dickerson dissed by Trump — who began their interview with a smirking gibe at “Deface The Nation” — Colbert takes serious umbrage. Dickerson is too dignified to trade snaps with Trump. “But I’m no John Dickerson…When you insult one member of the CBS family, you insult us all.”

What follows is a fusillade of burns and obscenities never before heard on network television to describe a president of the United States. Like so much that involves Trump, it is a low point for the country. But it’s a high point for comedy.

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

The late Sen. John McCain

I don't know Kyrsten Sinema, but I did know John McCain. Not at all intimately, to be sure, but just enough to say -- despite her pretensions and the fantasies of her flacks that she is the reincarnation of the war hero in a purple wig -- that Kyrsten Sinema is no John McCain.

Lately Sinema has advertised herself as a "maverick," by which she means that she flouts the positions and policies of her party's leadership, and is supposed to pair her with McCain, who sometimes strayed from the Republican party line. Her most notorious attempt at imitation occurred last year with a gesture on the Senate floor marking her vote against a minimum wage increase. Her coy mimicry of the admired war hero was synthetic, leaving an unpleasant odor in its wake. When McCain delivered his bold "thumbs down" on gutting Obamacare, he was protecting Arizona's working families – not betraying them.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}