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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Jimmy Kimmel knows how to give and take. In today’s clip, the comic parses his words carefully while making sure not to appoint himself the world’s foremost expert on politics.

For instance, Kimmel calls President Trump an idiot, and also calls himself an idiot. He tacitly admits that some of Bob Woodward’s popular new book could be fiction…while bashing 45 for publishing harmful fiction of his own.

Most importantly, the late-night host has a theory about which anonymous “senior White House official” wrote the controversial New York Times op-ed detailing Trump’s fight against his own administration, which leans too far in an establishment-GOP direction for the Orange One’s taste.

You might be expecting a punch line or a gag…but it’s actually a damn solid hypothesis.

Here’s a hint – if Trump’s “Space Force” manages to destroy the “Lodestar,” the President’s victim might be high enough in the food chain for it to be considered an historic “assassination.” Flags might fly at half-mast for a very, very long time…except at joyful parties thrown by Democrats in the days to follow.

Press play for the proof.

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A scene from "Squid Game" on Netflix

Reprinted with permission from Responsible Statecraft

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Reprinted with permission from Creators

In New York City, a statue of Thomas Jefferson has graced the City Council chamber for 100 years. This week, the Public Design Commission voted unanimously to remove it. "Jefferson embodies some of the most shameful parts of our country's history," explained Adrienne Adams, a councilwoman from Queens. Assemblyman Charles Barron went even further. Responding to a question about where the statue should go next, he was contemptuous: "I don't think it should go anywhere. I don't think it should exist."

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