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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Nobody, and least of all Mike Bloomberg, should be surprised to hear late-night comics make fun of his spending on Super Tuesday primaries where he came up short, so to speak. Or as Jimmy Kimmel puts it, "He basically spent the cost of an Avatar movie to find out nobody likes him."

Voting by mail in the California primary, as Kimmel did, could be confusing. The mail ballot featured a long list of candidates who are no longer running, including Marianne Williamson, Andrew Yang, and Julian Castro. "This is like the menu for a restaurant that's out of almost everything." (He claims to have cast a write-in vote for "Mr. T.")

Democrats aside, Kimmel remains focused on Trump – whose embarrassing White House photo-op with pharmaceutical executives was a tableau of the darkest comedy. Watching the president ask whether public health authorities can stem the new virus using the "solid"old flu vaccine is truly chilling.

Equally troubling to Jimmy is the prospect that Mike Pence may be a viral vector himself after shaking hands with a possibly infected Florida kid. If so, the potential for its spread to Trump and the many acolytes of the Trump cult in Washington is…highly amusing.

Click and chortle.

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

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