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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters.

Alex Jones’ ex-wife Kelly Jones said the prominent conspiracy theorist was violent toward her during their marriage.

Jones described her “nightmare” marriage during a wide-ranging April 3 interview on the David PakmanShow in which she talked about an ongoing custody dispute with her ex-husband, his threats last year against Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), and his rise as a prominent backer of President Donald Trump. The couple divorced in 2005.

Kelly said that she and her ex-husband met after she moved to Austin, TX, and was working for a public access TV station where they had the same producer. While initially drawn to him because he was “different than anybody I had ever met,” she said that several years into the relationship, “suddenly I was living in a domestically violent situation completely isolated from all friends and family.”

Citing what she described as her ex-husband’s “lack of control,” anger problems, and substance abuse issues, Jones said, “It was a nightmare to be with him, it was horrible, and especially towards the end it was awful, untenable.” Jones said she stayed in the relationship for as long as she did because she was in “a domestic violence cycle.” But she said when she saw her children “starting to emulate” some of their father’s mannerisms, she concluded that “like a lot of domestic violence victims” she was “fooling” herself that “this isn’t having an effect on them.”

Jones said that she is speaking out to help others who may be in similar situations, telling Pakman, “The reason why I’m coming out so hard, too, is I divorced Alex Jones. And everybody looked at me and gaslit me and said I was a liar and worse and treated me horribly, victim-shamed me when I came forward with serious concerns about abuse, and neglect, and other things.”

“If that can happen to me with Alex Jones, there’s people back there all over Travis [County in Texas] and all over this country who don’t have the possibility of this kind of publicity because they didn’t divorce a notorious unwell person. But I did. Doesn’t that concern you, America, that this is happening in family court?”

Two former employees of Alex Jones’ Infowars outlet recently filed complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) alleging abusive behavior from Jones and other Infowars employees while on the job. He is currently embroiled in controversy over his attacks against student survivors of the February mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, FL, and he is facing defamation lawsuits brought by individuals he or his outlet falsely identified as being involved in recent mass casualty events.

Kelly Jones’ full interview is below:

Header image by Sarah Wasko / Media Matters

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