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#FamousPresidentTrumpQuotes started trending Wednesday afternoon as Twitter users across the U.S. mused on what they might hear from a potential President Trump.

Between insinuating that gun violence against Hillary Clinton might be an option for “Second Amendment people” and being publicly excoriated for it by celebrated journalist Dan Rather, the GOP nominee has had a bad week for the record books.

The internet took notes.

Some of the Tweets made throwback references to things Trump had actually said:

Others were famous words re-imagined by a President Trump:


Still others were simply comedic takes on what we might expect from a President Trump:

Finally, many expressed hope that we may never have to hear the words “President Trump” at all:

Photo: Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump gives two thumbs up as he stands in the Trump family box with his daughter Ivanka (R) awaiting the arrival onstage of his son Eric at the conclusion of former rival candidate Senator Ted Cruz’s address during the third night at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, July 20, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein

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Reprinted with permission from DailyKos

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Reprinted with permission from DailyKos

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