The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

Bruce Heyman, the former U.S. Ambassador to Canada, on Monday slammed Donald Trump’s treatment of Justin Trudeau, and Canada in general, demanding the president apologize for his surrogate’s claim there’s a “special place in hell” for people like the Canadian prime minister.

“That’s unconscionable,” Heyman said.“Anybody who represents the United States of America from the White House using that kind of language with any world leader of any type, I think is uncalled for. When you use it with your best friend, your next door neighbor, your greatest ally, and I think one of your singular best trading partners, it’s completely uncalled for, unprofessional, and I call for, today, an apology. I think he should apologize to the prime minister. But more importantly, he should apologize to the Canadian public. Using that type of language is not professional, it’s not called for, and I tell you, I was deeply disappointed to see this lack of professionalism on his part.”

Heyman added he’s “of course … embarrassed” about Trump’s behavior during the  G-7 meeting, arguing the United States “was doing everything it could do to disrupt this meeting.”

“The president, coming late, stands before the cameras and says, ‘Why don’t we add Russia to the group’. I mean seriously, Russia, who took over Crimea, all the violence that’s taken place in Ukraine, the poisoning of people in the U.K., the influence in our election this last time period,” Heyman recounted. “This is completely unacceptable, and he knew it would be.”

Noting the president said last week the most important part about his upcoming meeting with Kim Jong-un os “attitude,” Heyman argued Trump “has had a really bad attitude with his partners and his allies.”

“I think he set the news in a completely wrong direction as he headed off to Singapore,” Heyman said. “I think we’re in a difficult place now, I’d like to see this thing settle down. Let’s use diplomacy and find a path to success with the Canadians in particular.”

Elizabeth Preza is the Managing Editor of AlterNet. Follow her on Twitter @lizacisms.

 

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Mark Levin

Politico reported Friday that John Eastman, the disgraced ex-law professor who formulated many of former President Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election results, was also apparently in communication with Fox News host Mark Levin. The story gets even more interesting from there, revealing the shell game that right-wing media personalities engage in while doubling as political operatives.

A legal filing by Eastman’s attorneys reveals that, among the messages Eastman is still attempting to conceal from the House January 6 committee are 12 pieces of correspondence with an individual matching Levin’s description as “a radio talk show host, is also an attorney, former long-time President (and current board chairman) of a public interest law firm, and also a former fellow at The Claremont Institute.” Other details, including a sloppy attempt to redact an email address, also connect to Levin, who did not respond to Politico’s requests for comment.

Keep reading... Show less

Sen. Wendy Rogers

Youtube Screenshot

There have been powerful indicators of the full-bore radicalization of the Republican Party in the past year: the 100-plus extremist candidates it fielded this year, the apparent takeover of the party apparatus in Oregon, the appearance of Republican officials at white nationalist gatherings. All of those are mostly rough gauges or anecdotal evidence, however; it’s been difficult to get a clear picture of just how deeply the extremism has penetrated the party.

Using social media as a kind of proxy for their real-world outreach—a reasonable approach, since there are few politicians now who don’t use social media—the Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights decided to get a clearer picture of the reach of extremist influences in official halls of power by examining how many elected officials participate in extremist Facebook groups. What it found was deeply troubling: 875 legislators in all 50 states, constituting nearly 22% of all elected GOP lawmakers, identified as participating members of extremist Facebook groups.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}