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Colbert Mocks Fox News On Avoiding January 6 Coverage

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Even if Fox News choose to ignore the explosive January 6th hearings like Covid guidance in order to keep their viewers ignorant as always, every major news network broadcasted the first of several high-profile hearings involcing all the sordid details of the January 6th insurrection. And while the Republican party of treason claimed that the first airing of hearings would be a "nothing burger," it was a freaking impossible burger.

The Late Show host Stephen Colbert weighed in on why the hearings were quite significant and why Fox News desperately made sure not a single one of their sheep (or viewers) turned the channel.

“They were wrong,” he said to cheers from his audience. “It was such a juicy burger that Fox News knew that even their viewers would be tempted to take a bite. Which is why—and this is true—for the hour of his show opposite the hearings, Tucker Carlson took no commercial breaks.”

“Do you understand what that means?” he asked. “Fox News is willing to lose money to keep their viewers from flipping over and accidentally learning information.” But the host said he wasn’t “surprised” because “that’s the first rule of any cult: never leave the compound.” The second rule? “Present your testicles to the tanning station.”

Watch the entire segment below:

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