The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC) is facing calls to resign after news broke that he dumped as much as $1.7 million in stock ahead of the market’s steep downturn following the coronavirus outbreak.

Burr chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee — which was receiving daily classified briefings about the virus at the time of his sale.

Critics say that makes Burr’s sale unethical, as he possibly used information the rest of the public did not have in order to save himself money amid the stock market slide.

It’s unclear whether Burr will resign — or face any consequences for his actions.

In trying to excuse Burr’s actions, his spokesperson said in a statement to Politico, “Senator Burr filed a financial disclosure form for personal transactions made several weeks before the U.S. and financial markets showed signs of volatility due to the growing coronavirus outbreak.”

Of course, that explanation is exactly what is drawing criticism.

A poll from the progressive organization Data for Progress showed that 50 percent of North Carolina voters want Burr to resign.

If Burr resigned, Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper would pick his replacement. But unlike many states, where the governor is free to choose whomever they want to fill the vacancy, Cooper would be forced to pick a Republican.

That’s because in 2018, the state’s GOP-controlled legislature changed the law to tie Cooper’s hand.

According to the law:

The governor shall appoint from a list of three persons recommended by the state executive committee of the political party with which the vacating member was affiliated when elected if that party executive committee makes recommendations within 30 days of the occurrence of the vacancy.

That means that Cooper would be given a list of three Republicans to choose from.

The law change was one of a handful of ways the state’s Republican legislators tried to strip Cooper of power after he won in 2016.

Among other things, the legislature weakened Cooper’s control of state elections, including trying to ensure that Republicans would chair state elections boards in every election year. That law in particular was ruled unconstitutional.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Republicans in the Arizona state Senate are officially off the hook for the $2.8 million needed to replace hundreds of voting machines ruined during the GOP-led, scandal-ridden "audit" of the 2020 election results in the state, the Arizona Republic reported.

The Maricopa County Board of Supervisors unanimously voted in August to force GOP state senators — who had signed an agreement saying that they would be responsible for any costs incurred from their "forensic audit" of the state's 2020 election — to pay the millions for the machines.

Keep reading... Show less

In December 2019, when then-President Donald Trump was facing his first of two impeachments, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie launched the nonprofit Right Direction America to defend him. The 2022 campaign of far-right Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida, a hardcore Trumpista, donated $100,000 to the nonprofit earlier this year during Trump's second impeachment — and journalist Roger Sollenberger, in an article published by the Daily Beast, stresses that the donation raises some questions.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}