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The House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack

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The House Select Committee on the January 6 Attack has just announced it will hold a hearing on Tuesday, a last-minute move that is expected to include testimony from a surprised, unnamed witness.

The New York Times reports the Committee says it has “recently obtained evidence.”

“The hearing is scheduled for 1 PM, according to a news release issued by the committee, in which it provided no other details about the surprise session,” the Times adds.

Calling the surprise hearing “momentous,” MSNBC’s Sahil Kapur reports: “They don’t say what the evidence is. They don’t say who the witness is. But this must be a pretty big development for the committee to change its plans on such short notice and hold the hearing after it had initially postponed all additional hearings to after recess, to July, when the House returns from the July 4 break.”

“Again, momentous news. We don’t have more details to report including the identity of the witness, but we’ll be following closely. This report comes after they held heartings last week talking about then-President Trump’s attempts to pressure the Justice Department to go along with his false or fabricated claims of a stolen election in order to stay in power. The committee seems to think it’s got something really big here. And as a result we’re going to get another hearing tomorrow afternoon. Tuesday afternoon at 1 PM Eastern.”

Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

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Albert Woodfox passed away on August 4, 2022. In what’s believed to be the record for the longest stint in solitary in American history, Woodfox spent approximately 43 years alone in a 6-by-9-foot cell in the Louisiana State Penitentiary, colloquially called Angola, the name of the plantation that once occupied the same land.

The circumstances of his incarceration are as mind-boggling as the length of time Woodfox languished in loneliness. Along with an inmate named Herman Wallace, Woodfox was falsely accused — and wrongly convicted twice — of killing a corrections officer. Woodfox, Wallace, and another inmate were known for their indefinite placement in segregation and were dubbed the “Angola 3.”

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons, a novel and a memoir. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

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