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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

The House Judiciary Committee announced on Monday that the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has agreed to give Congress key documents collected by former Special Counsel Robert Mueller during his Russia investigation.

In an official statement, Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler asserted, “I am pleased to announce that the Department of Justice has agreed to begin complying with our committee’s subpoena by opening Robert Mueller’s most important files to us, providing us with key evidence that the special counsel used to assess whether the president and others obstructed justice or were engaged in other misconduct.”

Nadler added, “ All members of the Judiciary Committee — Democrats and Republicans alike — will be able to view them. These documents will allow us to perform our constitutional duties and decide how to respond to the allegations laid out against the president by the special counsel.”

Although Attorney General William Barr has publicly released Mueller’s report in redacted form, Democrats in the House have moved to hold Barr in contempt of Congress for not giving them an unredacted version of the report. The House still won’t have access to a full unredacted version of Mueller’s report, but it will have an abundance of documents pertaining to the Russia investigation — including summaries of FBI interviews with witnesses  and memos cited in the report.

 

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