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Jon Stewart had some fun mocking the news coverage of his “secret” meetings with President Obama — though in fact, the two meetings were both on the White House visitor logs: “Something is not a ‘secret’ just because you don’t know about it.”

The Daily Show correspondent Jordan Klepper also interviewed an Arkansas pastor, who insisted that the local LGBT rights ordinance is actively discriminating against him. (Spoiler: It isn’t.)

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Larry Wilmore highlighted the American hunter who killed Cecil the Lion in Zimbabwe, by American dentist and hunter Walter Palmer.

And The Nightly Show contributors Mike Yard and Holly Walker both shared their ideas for responding to the problem of big game hunters. Yard offered some interesting ideas on how to solve the fact that hunters have too much time and money — while Walker herself has become a “big game hunter-hunter.” As she explained: “It’s not personal — it’s for sport.”

Jimmy Kimmel highlighted the story that Donald Trump gold a breastfeeding lawyer she was “disgusting.”

Photo by Marvin Moose

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

A true blue wave in November would not only include former Vice President Joe Biden defeating President Donald Trump, but Democrats retaking the U.S. Senate, expanding their majority in the House of Representatives, and winning victories in state races. None of that is guaranteed to happen, but according to an article by Elena Schneider, James Arkin and Ally Mutnick in Politico, some Republican activists are worried that when it comes to U.S. Senate races and online fundraising, the GOP is falling short.

"The money guarantees Democrats nothing heading into November 2020," Schneider, Arkin and Mutnick explain. "But with President Donald Trump's poll numbers sagging and more GOP-held Senate races looking competitive, the intensity of Democrats' online fundraising is close to erasing the financial advantage incumbent senators usually enjoy. That's making it harder to bend their campaigns away from the national trend lines — and helping Democrats' odds of flipping the Senate."

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