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President Obama made a special, full-length appearance on The Daily Show to promote the Iran nuclear deal — but first, he had an announcement to make to Jon Stewart: “I can’t believe that you’re leaving before me! In fact, I’m issuing a new executive order — that Jon Stewart cannot leave the show.”

Obama also discussed how he has adapted to the challenges posed by the modern media environment — and how he has viewed them as an opportunity to explain things in depth, and not just for the old nightly news sound-bites.

Obama and Stewart also talked about the issues of improving care for veterans, at a time of increased demands on the system while it has been committed to do more.

As the two of them discussed the complexities of making progress in government, Obama laid down a marker. “I can say this unequivocally: The VA is better now than when I came into office Government works better now than when I came into office. The economy is better now than when I came into office.” But, he said, it’s still not goo enough for him.

Larry Wilmore looked at this past weekend’s Ku Klux Klan rally at the South Carolina State House — in a segment called “I Can’t Believe This S**t Is Still Going On.”

Larry and the panel also discussed Bill Cosby’s newly revealed deposition from ten years ago.

Seth Meyers talked about the issues of political correctness in comedy — with Margaret Cho, a true expert at pulling off raunchy and ethnic-themed comedy in style.

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Rep. Devin Nunes

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

Republican Rep. Devin Nunes of California is retiring from Congress at the end of 2021 to work for former President Donald Trump.

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From left Ethan Crumbley and his parents Jennifer and James Crumbley

Mug shot photos from Oakland County via Dallas Express

After the 2012 massacre at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, then-Rep. Mike Rogers, a Michigan Republican, evaded calls for banning weapons of war. But he had other ideas. The "more realistic discussion," Rogers said, is "how do we target people with mental illness who use firearms?"

Tightening the gun laws would seem a lot easier and less intrusive than psychoanalyzing everyone with access to a weapon. But to address Rogers' point following the recent mass murder at a suburban Detroit high school, the question might be, "How do we with target the adults who hand powerful firearms to children with mental illness?"

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