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Jimmy Kimmel sat down with Donald Trump himself, and decided to surprise The Donald with a special new children’s book: “Winners Aren’t Losers.”

As one example: “This lobster’s a loser. Throw him in the pot! I like a lobster who doesn’t get caught.” Donald Trump apparently enjoyed this reference to the time he insulted John McCain for having been a prisoner of war.

The Daily Show‘s Desi Lydic did a fact-check on the Republican debate. And well, it wasn’t pretty.

Larry Wilmore examined Ben Carson’s performance at the debate, and what looked like a lot of attempts to stall on talking about foreign policy: “Carson’s acting like a kid who has to do a book report, for a book he didn’t read.”

Seth Meyers reviewed the GOP debate, and how all the hype going into it — that Donald Trump would face off against Ted Cruz — simply didn’t come to pass. In fact, almost none of the other candidates even tried to take The Donald on — except for his “favorite punching bag” Jeb Bush.

Stephen Colbert highlighted Donald Trump’s “astonishingly excellent” and “extraordinary” doctor’s letter: “So while Trump is disease-free, evidently talking like him is highly contagious.”

Conan O’Brien told this zinger: “At a Donald Trump rally the other night, a supporter shouted out the Nazi salute, ‘Sieg heil.’ Trump immediately responded, ‘There is no place for that here — save it for my inauguration.'”

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Rep. Devin Nunes

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

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From left Ethan Crumbley and his parents Jennifer and James Crumbley

Mug shot photos from Oakland County via Dallas Express

After the 2012 massacre at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, then-Rep. Mike Rogers, a Michigan Republican, evaded calls for banning weapons of war. But he had other ideas. The "more realistic discussion," Rogers said, is "how do we target people with mental illness who use firearms?"

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