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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

Donald Trump spent more than 60 percent of his time over the past 3 months in “Executive Time,” according to a White House source who leaked copies of the president’s private schedule to Axios.

“Executive Time” is a loosely-defined title for the time Trump takes to watch television, engage with Twitter and make phone calls to friends and confidants. As Axios reports, Trump “usually spends the first 5 hours of the day” in “Executive Time.”

Six sources also told Axios that while Trump’s schedule claims he’s in the Oval Office from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. everyday, in reality the president “spends his mornings in the residence, watching TV, reading the papers, and responding to what he sees and reads” in phone calls with associates.

According to Axios, “ Trump has spent around 297 hours in Executive Time” since the midterm elections.

In a statement, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders told Axios Trump “has a different leadership style than his predecessors and the results speak for themselves.”

”While he spends much of his average day in scheduled meetings, events, and calls, there is time to allow for a more creative environment that has helped make him the most productive President in modern history,” she claimed.

For his part, Trump—despite all evidence to the contrary—has downplayed the amount of TV he watches throughout his work week. In 2017, the president insisted he doesn’t have time to watch television “primarily because of documents.”

“I’m reading documents,” Trump said. “A lot.”

You can view Trump’s leaked schedule here, via Axios.

Blake Neff

Twitter screenshot

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

On July 10, CNN's Oliver Darcy reported that Blake Neff, the top writer for Tucker Carlson's prime-time Fox News show, had been anonymously posting racist, misogynistic, homophobic, and other offensive content on an online forum for five years. Neff used racist and homophobic slurs, referred to women in a derogatory manner, and pushed white supremacist content while writing for Carlson's show. Neff resigned after CNN contacted him for comment.

As Darcy reported, in an interview with the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, Neff claimed anything Carlson read during his show was initially drafted by him. Darcy also found instances where there was "some overlap between the forum and the show," as sometimes the "material Neff encountered on the forum found its way on to Carlson's show."

During a 2018 appearance on Fox's The Five to promote his book Ship of Fools, Carlson mentioned Neff by name, calling him a "wonderful writer." Carlson also included Neff in the acknowledgments of the book.


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Before joining Fox News, Neff worked at The Daily Caller, a conservative news outlet that Carlson co-founded. The outlet has published a number of white supremacists, anti-Semites, and bigots.


Carlson has a long history of promoting white supremacist content on his show. His show has featured many guests who have connections to white supremacy and far-right extremism. Carlson has regularly been praised by Neo-Nazis and various far-right extremist figures, and he's been a hero on many white supremacist podcasts. Users of the extremist online message boards 4chan and 8chan have repeatedly praised Carlson.

The manifesto released by the gunman who killed 20 people in El Paso, Texas, in 2019 was strewn with content that echoed talking points from Carlson's show. Days after the shooting, Carlson declared that calling white supremacy a serious issue is a "hoax" as it is "actually not a real problem in America."

Carlson has been hemorrhaging advertisers following his racist coverage of the Black Lives Matters movement and the recent protests against police brutality. Now that we know his top writer was using content from white supremacist online message boards for Carlson's show, it is more imperative than ever that advertisers distance their brands away from this toxicity.