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Rep. Liz Cheney

Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) told NBC News' Chuck Todd on Sunday morning that the House Select Committee on the January 6 insurrection is examining whether Congress should enact “enhanced criminal penalties” to punish the “supreme dereliction of duty” by former President Donald Trump during the attack.

Speaking on Meet the Press, the Wyoming Republican said that the public will learn "new information" about the assault on the Capitol and the events leading up to it.

“Certainly our first priority is to make recommendations,” said Cheney. “And we’re looking at things like do we need additional enhanced criminal penalties for the kind of supreme dereliction of duty that you saw with President Trump, when he refused to tell the mob to go home after he had provoked that attack on the Capitol.”

What she has learned from the committee probe has made her even more troubled by Trump's conduct and the threat it posed to the nation.

“I have not learned a single thing since I have been on this committee that has made me less concerned, or less worried, about the gravity of the situation and the actions that President Trump took and also refused to take while the attack was underway,” Cheney remarked.

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