The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

The small city of Liberty, Missouri, has now become the site of a great victory for gun safety and freedom in America — though one man’s automobile had to make the ultimate sacrifice when its owner stocked it full of ammunition and inadvertently caused it to explode.

The Clay County Sheriff’s Office posted Tuesday on Facebook:

This afternoon a deputy went to investigate after seeing black smoke coming from a field near Old 210 Highway & Bluff Road, and found a car fully engulfed in flames. Ammunition in that burning car began discharging so he and responding firefighters kept their distance until it was safe to extinguish it.

The owner said that he was trying to burn trash when the field caught fire. Then he decided to drive over the flames to try and put it out, which caused his tire to catch fire and well, you can see how that turned out.

Liberty and Fishing River Firefighters were able to put the fire out safely.

A spokesman for the sheriff’s office told the Kansas City Star that the owner declined to file a police report for any possible insurance claim: “It seems like he’s just going to have to take a loss on that vehicle because I don’t think they’re going to cover it.”

Photo via the Clay County Sheriff’s Office, Missouri.

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

President Joe Biden

The price of gasoline is not Joe Biden's fault, nor did it break records. Adjusted for inflation, it was higher in 2008 when Republican George W. Bush was president. And that wasn't Bush's fault, either.

We don't have to like today's inflation, but that problem, too, is not Biden's doing. Republicans are nonetheless hot to pin the rap on him. Rising prices, mostly tied to oil, have numerous causes. There would be greater supply of oil and gas, they say, if Biden were more open to approving pipelines and more drilling on public land.

Keep reading... Show less
Youtube Screenshot

Heat deaths in the U.S. peak in July and August, and as that period kicks off, a new report from Public Citizen highlights heat as a major workplace safety issue. With basically every year breaking heat records thanks to climate change, this is only going to get worse without significant action to protect workers from injury and death.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration admits that government data on heat-related injury, illness, and death on the job are “likely vast underestimates.” Those vast underestimates are “about 3,400 workplace heat-related injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work per year from 2011 to 2020” and an average of 40 fatalities a year. Looking deeper, Public Citizen found, “An analysis of more than 11 million workers’ compensation injury reports in California from 2001 through 2018 found that working on days with hotter temperatures likely caused about 20,000 injuries and illnesses per year in that state, alone—an extraordinary 300 times the annual number injuries and illnesses that California OSHA (Cal/OSHA) attributes to heat.”

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}