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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Shareblue.

James Alex Fields Jr., the neo-Nazi who killed anti-racist activist Heather Heyer in a white supremacist riot in Charlottesville last year, was found guilty of first degree murder Friday. A Virginia jury took just over seven hours to reach its verdict.

Fields, who was in Charlottesville to attend the “United the Right” rally with other self-described Nazis and white supremacists, drove his car into Heyer and other counter-protesters, killing Heyer. Another 35 people were injured, some seriously.

Despite the unapologetically racist motivations of crowd that descended on Charlottesville to riot against the removal of a Confederate statue, Trump later said both sides were to blame for the fatal violence and described them as merely “very fine people.”

After the attack, Trump equated America’s founding fathers with the pro-slavery Confederacy and continued his strategy of using the presidency to further racist causes.

The public meltdown and support of racism generated a massive national backlash against Trump.

Charities canceled events that were planned at his Mar-a-Lago resort rather than associate themselves with his Nazi sympathizing.

CEOs began withdrawing from presidential advisory councils, and Trump was forced to disband them as the toxicity grew.

Trump continued to defend his response to the Charlottesville attack despite the public outcry.

He even tried to speak to Susan Bro, Heyer’s mother. She flatly rejected him.

“I saw an actual clip of him at a press conference, equating the protesters — like Ms. Heyer — with the KKK and the white supremacists,” Bro said. “You can’t wash this one away by shaking my hand and saying, ‘I’m sorry.’ I’m not forgiving him for that.”

As the Washington Post notes, Fields is still awaiting a separate federal trial for the charge of hate crimes, for which he could receive the death penalty.

Trump, meanwhile, has never retracted his support for the Nazis he called “very fine people.”

Published with permission of The American Independent.

Actor as Donald Trump in Russia Today video ad

Screenshot from RT's 'Trump is here to make RT Great Again'

Russia Today, the network known in this country as RT, has produced a new "deep fake" video that portrays Donald Trump in post-presidential mode as an anchor for the Kremlin outlet. Using snippets of Trump's own voice and an actor in an outlandish blond wig, the ad suggests broadly that the US president is indeed a wholly owned puppet of Vladimir Putin– as he has so often given us reason to suspect.

"They're very nice. I make a lot of money with them," says the actor in Trump's own voice. "They pay me millions and hundreds of millions."

But when American journalists described the video as "disturbing," RT retorted that their aim wasn't to mock Trump, but his critics and every American who objects to the Russian manipulations that helped bring him to power.

As an ad for RT the video is amusing, but the network's description of it is just another lie. Putin's propagandists are again trolling Trump and America, as they've done many times over the past few years –- and this should be taken as a warning of what they're doing as Election Day approaches.

The Lincoln Project aptly observed that the Russians "said the quiet part out loud" this time, (Which is a bad habit they share with Trump.)