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Donald Trump said on Wednesday that Nevada should not be allowed to proceed with mail-in voting because "it's a very political state and the governor happens to be a Democrat."

Trump's campaign sued the state on Tuesday, opposing a recent expansion of mail-in voting there in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The state's June primary was held almost entirely by mail without incident.


On the same day Trump's campaign filed suit against Nevada, Trump said that voting by mail in Florida is acceptable. Florida's governor, Ron DeSantis, is a Republican and a close ally of Trump. Trump endorsed and supported DeSantis' recent gubernatorial campaign.

"Whether you call it Vote by Mail or Absentee Voting, in Florida the election system is Safe and Secure, Tried and True," he tweeted Tuesday. "Florida's Voting system has been cleaned up (we defeated Democrats attempts at change), so in Florida I encourage all to request a Ballot & Vote by Mail! #MAGA"

Trump has voted absentee in Florida. Several other members of his inner circle — including his daughter Ivanka Trump and Vice President Mike Pence — have also voted absentee in past elections.

From an Aug. 5 press availability:

DONALD TRUMP: Absentee voting, great. But this mail-in voting where they mail — indiscriminately — millions and millions of ballots to people, you're never going to know who won the election. You can't have that.
And Nevada's a big state, it's an important state, it's a very political state, and the governor happens to be a Democrat, and I don't believe the post office can be set up. They were given no notice, I mean you're talking about millions of votes.
No, it'll be a — it's, it's a catastrophe waiting to happen.


Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Photo by Mediamodifier from Pixabay

Reprinted with permission from TomDispatch

When it rains, pieces of glass, pottery, and metal rise through the mud in the hills surrounding my Maryland home. The other day, I walked outside barefoot to fetch one of my kid's shoes and a pottery shard stabbed me in the heel. Nursing a minor infection, I wondered how long that fragment dated back.

A neighbor of mine found what he said looked like a cartridge case from an old percussion-cap rifle in his pumpkin patch. He told us that the battle of Monocacy had been fought on these grounds in July 1864, with 1,300 Union and 900 Confederate troops killed or wounded here. The stuff that surfaces in my fields when it storms may or may not be battle artifacts, but it does remind me that the past lingers and that modern America was formed in a civil war.

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