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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Official White House Photo by Joyce N. Boghosian

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

One day after President Donald Trump released a video committing to a peaceful transfer of power, he was banned from Twitter—his strongest form of communication with his base. As expected, the new directive did not go over well with Trump and now, according to The New York Times, he regrets committing to a peaceful transition.

Amid calls for Trump's resignation or impeachment, the isolated lame-duck president is reportedly seething behind closed doors at the White House and has made it clear that he will not resign.


The paper reports:

At the White House, Mr. Trump struck a defiant tone, insisting that he would remain a potent force in American politics even as aides and allies abandoned him and his post-presidential prospects turned increasingly bleak. Behind closed doors, he made clear that he would not resign and expressed regret about releasing a video on Thursday committing to a peaceful transition of power and condemning the violence at the Capitol that he had egged on a day before.

The latest report came shortly after Trump's commitment to a peaceful transfer of power. In a perplexing video message, the president offered a tone completely different from his typical attacking rhetoric. While he did not make any apologies for his involvement in the siege on the U.S. Capitol, he called for calm as he finally admitted that a new administration would be taking over on Jan. 20.

"Like all Americans, I am outraged by the violence, lawlessness, and mayhem," Trump said in the video. He also claimed: "the demonstrators who infiltrated the capitol have defiled the seat of American democracy."

He added, "To those who engaged in the acts of violence and destruction, you do not represent our country. And to those who broke the law, you will pay."

As Inauguration Day nears, lawmakers are on edge as they are concerned about more potential damage an unpredictable Trump could cause in his final days at the White House.

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Rep. Louie Gohmert

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) is demanding the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Justice Department tell Congress what they know about their own alleged "participation" in Donald Trump's January 6 insurrection, which led to at least seven deaths. Gohmert falsely claims the attack on the U.S. Capitol – which in reality was an attempted coup designed to overturn a free and fair election – was instead a "monumental entrapment scheme used as a pretext to imprison otherwise harmless protestors" and used to "frame the entire MAGA movement as potential domestic terrorists."

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