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(Mitt Romney, dressed as someone who actually fits in at Liberty University)

Perhaps the oddest subplot in the 2012 presidential campaign so far is Republican candidate Mitt Romney’s passion for dressing up in elaborate costumes and pulling odd pranks.

Here at The National Memo, we don’t see why tMitt should have all the fun. So we imagined how the Massachusetts master of disguise would look in some of his favorite outfits:

Artwork by Lynn Zhong

Police Officer

Romney liked to dress up in a Michigan State Trooper’s uniform and pull over unsuspecting motorists as a college student. As his Stanford classmate Robin Madden recalls “We all thought, ‘Wow, that’s pretty creepy.’”

Firefighter

Today Romney wants to fire our firemen, but while he was in high school he once burst into a local store late at night dressed in a full fireman’s uniform, swinging a fire ax over his head and screaming “where’s the fire?”

Mobster

In another “hilarious” prank, Romney charged into a store dressed “gangland fashion,” declared “this is a stickup,” and sprayed the shop with sparks from his toy Tommy gun.

Tea Partier

Romney has pretended to be a Tea Party loyalist ever since he decided that being a “progressive” wouldn’t win him the Republican presidential nomination.

Vietnam Infantryman

Romney has said that “I longed in many respects to actually be in Vietnam” during the war — although he actually avoided the draft while performing Mormon missionary work and residing at a French palace.

Have your own idea for a Romney costume? Send your photoshops to editors@nationalmemo.com, and we’ll feature the best ones on our website!

Photo by U.S. Embassy Jerusalem/ CC BY 2.0

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Senior White House adviser Jared Kushner—who like his boss and father-in-law President Donald Trump is a product of his family's fortune—was mercilessly lambasted on social media on Monday after he mocked Black Lives Matter activists and suggested that many Black people don't want to be successful.

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