The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff blasted the Trump administration on Tuesday for their last-minute decision to hold up congressional testimony by Gordan Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union.

Just before he was scheduled to testify about efforts by Trump to get Ukraine to dig up political dirt on former Vice President Joe Biden, the State Department announced that Sondland would be blocked from appearing.

“The failure to produce this witness, the failure to produce these documents, we consider yet additional strong evidence of obstruction of the constitutional functions of Congress, a coequal branch of government,” Schiff explained.

Schiff then went into detail on the evidence that is being hidden.

“We are also aware that the ambassador has text messages or emails on a personal device which has been provided to the State Department,” he said, noting that the department is “withholding those messages” from the committee.

Schiff said the texts involve discussions between Sondland, Ukrainian officials, and Trump along with “at least one U.S. senator.”

According to Schiff, the committee is investigating to see if Trump, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and others worked to “cover up this misconduct.”

“[The impeachment inquiry] goes to the core of whether the president abused his office to seek political help in his reelection campaign and did so to the detriment of our nation’s security,” Schiff said.

Trump was “effectively coercing a country that has been invaded by Russia to investigate a rival and condition the relationship between this country and that country on whether they were willing to play ball,” he added.

“It is hard to imagine a set of facts more damaging to our national security and our standing in the world, but also more of a fundamental breach of the president’s oath of office,” Schiff said.

“The American people have the right to know if the president is acting in their interests, in the nation’s interests, with an eye towards our national security and not in his narrow personal, political interests. They have a right to know, indeed the American people have a need to know and through this impeachment inquiry, we are determined to find the answers.”

Published with permission of The American Independent.

Photo Credit: Gage Skidmore

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Rep. Troy Nehls speaks at a news conference with House Republicans on July 27, 2021.

Screenshot from C-SPAN 2

Reprinted with permission from American Independent

House Republicans who were slated to be on the select committee to probe the January 6 insurrection held a news conference Tuesday morning to complain they are being shut out from the probe.

Keep reading... Show less

Rep. Jim Jordan

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy was clearly pandering to the Republican Party's lowest common denominator when he picked Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio as one of the five Republicans he wanted to serve on Speaker Nancy Pelosi's select committee on the January insurrection — a pick that Pelosi flatly rejected, inspiring McCarthy to angrily respond that if Pelosi wouldn't accept all of his picks, she couldn't have any of them. But Pelosi made a wise decision, given how aggressively Jordan promoted the Big Lie and former President Donald Trump's bogus elect fraud claims. And author Sidney Blumenthal, in an op-ed published by The Guardian on July 27, lists some things that Jordan might be asked if he testifies before Pelosi's committee.

Keep reading... Show less
x

Close