The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

In a triumphantly absurd cold open, Saturday Night Live featured Rudy Giuliani's stunning appearance before the Michigan House Oversight Committee -- where Rudy (Kate McKinnon) emitted farts so loud that room microphones captured them for posterity.

Flatulence wasn't only an embarrassing moment but a metaphor for the Trump "stupid coup" that Giuliani and his "elite strike force" associate Jenna Ellis (Lauren Holt) tried to advance in Lansing.

"As my associate Ms. Ellis and I will prove today, this election was stolen from the American people with a level of trickery not seen since Houdini," lisps the former mayor, just before a loud farting sound erupts. "Hey that wasn't me! That was you guys!"

A skeptical Michigan Republican state senator (Mikey Day) notes that Giuliani has presented "zero evidence," a complaint he repeats throughout the "election fraud hearing."

Rudy then unveils the testimony of "a dozen highly intelligent, barely intoxicated individuals who are all eyewitnesses" -- notably including the belligerent Melissa Carone (played, as anticipated, by the brilliant Cecily Strong). She swiftly admonishes the legislators to "maybe lose the attitude first, just like you lost all those Trump ballots."

While Carone's viral performance is the highlight, she's followed by hilarious witnesses (Alex Moffat, Heidi Gardner, Chloe Fineman) who ably reproduce the Michigan hearing's surreal atmosphere.

It's a gas.



Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

President Joe Biden

The price of gasoline is not Joe Biden's fault, nor did it break records. Adjusted for inflation, it was higher in 2008 when Republican George W. Bush was president. And that wasn't Bush's fault, either.

We don't have to like today's inflation, but that problem, too, is not Biden's doing. Republicans are nonetheless hot to pin the rap on him. Rising prices, mostly tied to oil, have numerous causes. There would be greater supply of oil and gas, they say, if Biden were more open to approving pipelines and more drilling on public land.

Keep reading... Show less
Youtube Screenshot

Heat deaths in the U.S. peak in July and August, and as that period kicks off, a new report from Public Citizen highlights heat as a major workplace safety issue. With basically every year breaking heat records thanks to climate change, this is only going to get worse without significant action to protect workers from injury and death.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration admits that government data on heat-related injury, illness, and death on the job are “likely vast underestimates.” Those vast underestimates are “about 3,400 workplace heat-related injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work per year from 2011 to 2020” and an average of 40 fatalities a year. Looking deeper, Public Citizen found, “An analysis of more than 11 million workers’ compensation injury reports in California from 2001 through 2018 found that working on days with hotter temperatures likely caused about 20,000 injuries and illnesses per year in that state, alone—an extraordinary 300 times the annual number injuries and illnesses that California OSHA (Cal/OSHA) attributes to heat.”

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}