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In About Face, McCarthy Invites Veep Harris To Achieve ‘Great Things Together’

Reprinted with permission from American Independent

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy on Wednesday presented Vice President Kamala Harris with a photo of her swearing-in as a gift, telling Harris he is "proud" of her and made a comment about how leaders are judged "not just by our words, but by our actions."

"So let's go forth from here together, accomplish great things for the American people, and every time you look at this photo, remember the beginning of the job we have to do," McCarthy said as he presented Harris — the first female vice president in history — with the gift.

McCarthy, however, did not atone for his role in the violent insurrection at the Capitol exactly two weeks ago, in which a Donald Trump-supporting mob violently broke into the building to try to push lawmakers to block President Joe Biden and Harris' victory.

McCarthy was part of the slew of GOP lawmakers who helped radicalize that mob with lies of voter fraud.

"President Trump won this election, so everyone who's listening, do not be quiet," McCarthy said in an appearance on Fox News on Nov. 5. "We cannot allow this to happen before our very eyes."

As leader of House Republicans, McCarthy also signed off on Trump's anti-democratic attempt to force Republicans to vote against certifying Biden and Harris' legitimate win.

And ultimately, McCarthy was also one of the 147 Republican members of Congress who still voted to block certification of Biden and Harris' victory, even after the insurrectionists took over the Capitol on Jan. 6.

Now, McCarthy appears to be hoping no one remembers his role in spreading the lies that led to the attempted coup.

Biden himself spoke of this in his inaugural address.

"Recent weeks and months have taught us a painful lesson: There is truth and there are lies. Lies told for power and for profit. And each of us has a duty and a responsibility, as citizens, as Americans, and especially as leaders, leaders who have pledged to honor our Constitution and protect our nation, to defend the truth and defeat the lies," Biden said in his speech.

In the end, McCarthy was one of more than two-dozen Republican lawmakers who attended Biden and Harris' inauguration, despite having played a role in inciting the attempted coup.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Seditious GOP Is Getting Stripped Of Money

With much of corporate America vowing to withhold donations to Republican insurrectionists, party leaders have a choice to make. The Trump cult or the money? The money or the Trump cult?

One hoped that love of country and its democratic institutions would have been reason enough to strongly condemn fellow Republicans who tried to overturn the results of a legally certified election. Only a handful of Republicans rose to the occasion, with a few more signing on following the obscene Trump-fueled rampage on the Capitol.

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Congressional Republican ‘Feared For Their Lives’ If They Supported Impeachment

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Numerous Republicans in Congress have been afraid to publicly criticize President Donald Trump or challenge his debunked and baseless election fraud claims because they don't want to face a GOP primary challenge or be voted out of office in 2022. But according to Rep. Jason Crow, a Colorado Democrat, their fears go beyond their political interests — some of them feared being targeted for violent attacks if they voted in favor of any articles of impeachment against the president.

Interviewed by NBC News' Chuck Todd on Wednesday, Crow discussed impeachment proceedings against Trump and said, "A number of things are happening on the Republican side. A very small handful, I think, are kind of morally bankrupt individuals who have given in to these conspiracy theories and are too far gone to be redeemed. But the majority of them are actually paralyzed with fear. You know, I had a lot of conversations with my Republican colleagues last night. A couple of them broke down in tears, talking to me and saying that they are afraid for their lives if they vote for this impeachment."

Crow continued, "My response was, not to be unsympathetic, 'Welcome to the club.' That's leadership. Our country is in a very challenging time. Many of us have felt that way for a long time because we've stood up for our democracy, and we expect them to do the same."

Right-wing pundit Guy Benson — a Townhall editor who is also known for his radio show and Fox News appearances — responded to Crow's comments and tweeted that some House Republicans are, in fact, fearing for their "lives/physical safety":

It isn't hard to see why members of Congress are worried about political violence during the final days of Trump's presidency. Crow's comments during his interview with Todd came a week after a mob of pro-Trump insurrectionists stormed the Capitol in the hope of preventing Congress from certifying President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory — and a week after extremists hoped to murder Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Trump demanded that Pence overturn the Electoral College results, which he didn't have the power to do, during the joint session of Congress held on Wednesday last week. Groups of extremists, believing that Pence had betrayed Trump, could be seen chanting "Hang Mike Pence" in Washington, D.C. And some of them set up a hangman's noose near the Capitol Building.

Also quite disturbing is a statement by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who said that when the Capitol Building was under siege, she feared for her life and feared that "QAnon and White supremacist sympathizers" in the House of Representatives would tell people in the mob where to find her.

McConnell Believes Trump Committed Impeachable Acts — And Aims To 'Purge' Him

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Outgoing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell believes President Donald Trump committed impeachable acts related to the insurrection on the U.S. Capitol, according to a report Tuesday in the New York Times, and he is pleased that the Democrats are moving forward with a plan to push for his removal.

Democrats plan to vote on an impeachment article on Wednesday, which is expected to pass, and McConnell reportedly said he wants to see what final form it takes. The report does not expressly say McConnell would be looking to fast-track impeachment or that he would even vote in favor of removal himself.

However, it said that McConnell believes impeachment "will make it easier to purge" Trump from the Republican Party. It's not clear exactly what this means, but impeachment theoretically would give the Senate the opportunity to prevent Trump from taking office again.

The story also noted that around a dozen Republicans in the House may vote for impeachment. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy has made it clear that he opposes impeachment, but the Times found that he is not lobbying his caucus to oppose it. And he has reportedly pushed the idea of censuring the president as an alternative to impeachment, saying he could get substantial GOP support for such a measure, though House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has dismissed the idea.

CNN's Manu Raju confirmed the report:


Right before the siege of the Capitol on Jan. 6, McConnell delivered a speech in the building finally denouncing Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the election result.

"The voters, the courts, and the states have all spoken," he said. "They've all spoken. If we overrule them, it would damage our republic forever."