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White Nationalists Gloating As Murdochs Back Carlson’s Anti-Immigrant Rant

Reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

Tucker Carlson has been popular with white nationalists for awhile now. But he has cemented his reputation as one of their all-time immortals this week by proving not only that he can spew white-nationalist dogma on primetime TV and not get fired for it, but he can double down on the hatemongering and even gain the backing of conservative Jewish rabbis.

After Carlson regurgitated white-nationalist "replacement theory" in the context of American immigration and border issues last week, the Anti-Defamation League demanded Fox fire their most popular talk show host, and was refused by Fox's corporate heads. So as Carlson then piled on the theory this week, white nationalists and their "redpilled" followers were practically pumping their fists in glee.

Tucker Carlson doubles down on immigration 'replacement theory' www.youtube.com

"This week Tucker redpilled 4 million people and there's nothing liberals can do about it," tweeted Nick Fuentes, leader of the white-nationalist "Groyper Army" and its associated "America First" movement.

Fuentes tweet

Fuentes later crowed again: "Daily reminder that replacement theory is now politically mainstream and there is nothing the ADL and SPLC can do about it."

"This segment is one of the best things Fox News has ever aired and was filled with ideas and talking points VDARE.com pioneered many years ago," the notorious white nationalist site VDare tweeted in response to Monday's segment in which Carlson doubled down harder on the "replacement theory" rhetoric. "You should watch the whole thing."

"Literal anti-white Jewish shit," responded Mike Peinovich, the white nationalist host of The Daily Shoah, to the ADL's criticism. "If what Tucker Carlson said was wrong, why not just argue with him and prove him to be so? Jews and their minions never present any arguments for their positions. Why should they be taken seriously?"

"Tucker Carlson confirms what white nationalists have been talking about for decades: the white population of the US and wider West is being deliberately and maliciously replaced," tweeted the white nationalist Way of the World account. "They mean to take away power from us in our own lands by making us an electoral and social irrelevance."

"Great segment mentioning unmentionable reality of demographic replacement," tweeted Kevin MacDonald, an anti-Semitic academic beloved by neo-Nazis. "Doesn't explicitly mention Whites but obviously implied." He then described Carlson's attack on the Anti-Defamation League as a "must-see for conservatives."

This is not the first time that Carlson has made exactly these claims: He has touted the same theoryregarding immigrants "replacing" current voters in various segments in the past couple of years. (It is, naturally, an utterly specious claim: Voting requires citizenship, meaning those new immigrants are not eligible even to apply for five years; the naturalization application process then typically takes 15 months. Moreover, the 700,000 new citizens who take the oath every year—after which they may finally vote—represent only 0.2% of the total U.S. population.)

Carlson already has a remarkable record of dabbling increasingly in white supremacist rhetoric dating back to 2006, including recently unearthed recordings of his ramblings on radio. His greatest hits include a regurgitation of neo-Nazi propaganda about "white genocide" in Africa, not to mention his mutual promotion of the white nationalist website VDare. There is a reason white supremacists love Carlson's show, and why they assiduously watch it in hopes of picking up pointers.

Fox CEO Lachlan Murdoch defended Carlson, disingenuously claiming he had "decried and rejected replacement theory" when he said during the Thursday evening segment, "White replacement theory? No, no, this is a voting rights question."

Murdoch noted that the ADL had once honored his father, Rupert Murdoch, with a leadership award, to which ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt replied that the award was granted "over a decade ago, but let me be clear that we would not do so today, and it does not absolve you, him, the network, or its board from the moral failure of not taking action against Mr. Carlson."

And there was blowback for the ADL and Greenblatt. Former ADL chief Abraham Foxman criticized the callfor Carlson's firing: "Fox is not an anti-Semitic network," he said. "It's a lot of things but it's not an anti-Semitic network and it's certainly not an anti-Israel network."

In Israel, an organization of traditional orthodox rabbis, the Coalition for Jewish Values, attacked the ADL's stance, publishing a letter supported by 1,500 rabbis calling the accusation "grossly misplaced charges of antisemitism." It attacked Greenblatt, saying that "alas, the ADL has become markedly partisan under your leadership."

Carlson's Monday segment featured an unusually long 20-minute monologue in which Carlson dismissed his critics as "the usual chorus of hyper-aggressive liars" and reiterated his thesis—namely, that Democrats support mass immigration because it increases their electoral advantage and power.

He also attacked the ADL by claiming that it had itself embraced "replacement" theory—for Israel rather than the United States—in the past, pointing to a paper in which the ADL (then under Foxman's direction) argued against allowing more Palestinian refugees into Israel because it would lead to Jews becoming a "vulnerable minority" in their own nation.

"Why would any democratic nation make its own citizens less powerful?" Carlson said. "Isn't that the deepest betrayal of all? In the words of the ADL, why would a government subvert its own sovereign existence? Good question. Maybe ADL President Jonathan Greenblatt will join 'Tucker Carlson Tonight' some time to explain and tell us whether that same principle applies to the United States."

As Christopher Mathias notes, white nationalists were particularly enamored of this portion of the monologue, viewing it as the ultimate "gotcha" moment—one which, in fact, again echoed an argument they have made for decades.

"Demographic replacement, ADL, Israel, it's all there … a full redpill," commented Fuentes. "On primetime Fox News for 4 million mainstream conservatives. Can you feel it? We are inevitable."

Greenblatt was interviewed by CNN's Brian Stelter about the controversy, and noted that this reflects the raging epistemological battle that has warped Americans' sense of shared reality and induced millions into embracing false information:

This is the Trumpian war on truth that is still raging, it's raging because guys like Rupert Murdoch and his son, Lachlan Murdoch encourage it. It's raging because men like Paul Ryan sit silently on the Fox Corporation board of directors. Murdoch knows better. Ryan knows better. They know Tucker is cynically preying on his audience's fears, their fears of being replaced, fears of a changing, growing America. But the show goes on, the profits go on, they act like Tucker's invincible, they seem to think that he's the boss when in fact they are the bosses.

Fox CEO Lachlan Murdoch Defends White Nationalist Tucker Carlson

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

Fox Corp. CEO Lachlan Murdoch is defending Tucker Carlson's April 8 segment promoting the white supremacist "replacement" conspiracy theory after the Anti-Defamation League's chief executive, Jonathan Greenblatt, called for Carlson to be fired.

Over the weekend, Greenblatt appeared on CNN to explain how the Murdochs, Fox's board, and its advertisers enable Carlson to push white nationalist conspiracy theories on Fox News' prime time.


According to CNN, Murdoch "dismissed the Anti-Defamation League's demand that the company fire host Tucker Carlson, telling the organization in a letter that his company saw no problem with comments Carlson made about the racist 'great replacement' theory."

"Fox Corporation shares your values and abhors anti-semitism, white supremacy and racism of any kind," Murdoch wrote ADL chief executive Jonathan Greenblatt on Sunday. "In fact, I remember fondly the ADL honoring my father with your International Leadership Award, and we continue to support your mission.
"Concerning the segment of 'Tucker Carlson Tonight' on April 8th, however, we respectfully disagree," Murdoch continued in the letter, which the ADL provided CNN. "A full review of the guest interview indicates that Mr. Carlson decried and rejected replacement theory. As Mr. Carlson himself stated during the guest interview: 'White replacement theory? No, no, this is a voting rights question.'"

Murdoch is joined in defending Carlson by the Fox host's fan base -- a chorus of enthusiastic young white supremacists online.

Fox News Mocks Pandemic Health Rules But Enforces Masks, Tests, Distance For Staff

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

Fox News executives, up to and including Rupert and Lachlan Murdoch, have allowed the network's commentators to risk the lives of their viewers by downplaying the danger posed by the novel coronavirus. At the same time, those executives implemented serious public health measures -- the likes of which Fox personalities have denounced on-air -- to protect their staff and themselves from COVID-19.

Over the last year, Fox's on-air programming often discouraged its viewers from taking steps to protect themselves from the pandemic that has now killed more than 550,000 Americans -- and polls show those viewers listened.

Network commentators eagerly championed protests against business closures and social distancing measures; turned face masks into a culture war flashpoint; denounced urgent government warnings about how to stay safe over the holiday season; and expressed skepticism about vaccination.

But while Fox's on-air talent has told their audience that they need not take the pandemic too seriously, the network brass has responded with urgency.

Here are some of the steps Fox's corporate leadership took since the pandemic began to protect themselves and their employees, even as they profited from an audience that had been urged to disregard the virus.

On-Camera Distancing, Home Studios, Closed Offices

Fox personalities have repeatedly suggested that social distancing is ineffectivein preventing the spread of the coronavirus, and they have aggressively promoted protests against such measures.

But the rants of the on-air talent have come under socially distanced conditions enforced by Fox executives. Since mid-March of last year, Fox hosts have anchored their programs either from home studios, from trucks filled with studio equipment outside their homes, or from Fox studios retrofitted to allow substantial distance between participants.

In early May, Fox hosts were declaring the crisis over and rallying behind then-President Donald Trump's push to "reopen the country" by ending business closures enacted to slow the spread of the virus.

At the same time, Fox executives were pushing back plans to fully reopen their own offices, with only a skeleton crew working at Fox News headquarters to keep the network on-air. "A Friday memo from Fox Corp chief operating officer John Nallen extended the company's work from home directive through June 15," CNN's Brian Stelter reported on May 12, 2020.

He added, "On that date, at the earliest, Fox Corp properties like Fox News will begin a gradual reopening of offices. The date could very well be delayed further." It was.

Indeed, Fox's parent company, Fox Corp., has continued to push back the date at which it would reopen its offices. Lachlan Murdoch, Fox Corp.'s CEO, wrote in a internal memo last month that because "the health and safety of our workforce has remained my priority," the company's return-to-work date would come "no earlier than September 7, immediately after Labor Day."

Mask Wearing At Fox Offices

Some Fox personalities, particularly Tucker Carlson and Laura Ingraham, have frequently used their shows to cast doubt on the effectiveness of face masks in preventing the spread of COVID-19. Trump, a frequent Fox viewer, adopted that view, and polls show a swath of the network's audience did as well.

But masks are required in the common spaces at Fox's headquarters for those who do work in person, according to a network memo.

"We'd like to remind all employees to also don a face covering in Fox News Media shared spaces, particularly when you're not at a socially distanced workstation," the June 18, 2020, memo stated. "For your safety and the safety of others, the CDC as well as state & local officials have asked everyone to wear a face covering when unable to maintain 6-feet of social distance between one another."

Strict Rules For Live Audiences

When Fox tapes shows before a live audience, those participants agree to an array of pandemic measures. CNN's Oliver Darcy noted in response to a posting about tickets for the upcoming Fox program Gutfeld!:

Other Fox programs featuring live audiences have similarly required social distancing and mask usage.

event

Rupert Murdoch Immediately Vaccinated

Carlson has emerged in recent months as perhaps the nation's foremost coronavirus vaccine skeptic, using his massive platform to argue that the vaccines are less effective and more dangerous than advertised. He's been rewarded for that commentary, becoming the undisputed face of the network since the 2020 election. His prime-time colleague Ingraham has adopted similar themes.

One person who does not share Carlson's vaccine skepticism is the Fox host's foremost patron, network founder Rupert Murdoch. The Fox Corp. co-chairman was among the first people on the planet to be vaccinated against the coronavirus, receiving his first dose in December, a few months before turning 90.

"I would like to thank the key workers and the NHS (National Health Service) staff who have worked so hard throughout the pandemic, and the amazing scientists who have made this vaccine possible," Murdoch said in a statement at the time, adding, "I strongly encourage people around the world to get the vaccine as it becomes available."

Lachlan Murdoch Departs For COVID-Free Australia

Lachlan Murdoch was so eager to get away from the coronavirus that he fled the country last month.

The Fox Corp. executive chairman and his family left Los Angeles, where he and other top executives had been based, for their $50 million home in the suburbs of Sydney, Australia.

Why might he try to manage a cable news network from the other side of the globe? The country has some of the world's lowest coronavirus rates -- in part due to its strict quarantine procedures.

Murdoch Pushes Final Desperate Attempt To Smear Joe Biden

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

With President Donald Trump's reelection hopes seemingly fading, Fox News star Tucker Carlson made an 11th hour push on Tuesday night to try to will him to victory. He devoted his entire program to an interview with Tony Bobulinski, a former business partner of Hunter Biden, in the latest dubious salvo of an extensive campaign by Rupert and Lachlan Murdoch' media outlets to tarnish Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden via his son's business interests.

Carlson's interview had been heavily touted by Trump's allies, and the Fox host presented it on Tuesday as a devastating bombshell for Joe Biden. The reality is more mundane.

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