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Tag: lauren boebert

Listen: Boebert's Neighbors Called Sheriff After Confrontation With Her Husband

The neighbors of Representative Lauren Boebert (R-CO) dialed 911 after a wild altercation with her husband, Jayson Boebert, after he reportedly threatened them and ran over their mailbox.

According to The Denver Post, Boebert’s Colorado neighbors called the cops before 9 pm on August 4, warning the 911 dispatcher that Jayson, who neighbors say is as “dumb as a post” was on a rampage.

“There's about to be some sh** going down here,” Boebert’s neighbors told the cops. "It's Lauren Boebert's jackass husband, Jayson Boebert." The neighbors accused Jayson of threatening them, driving under the influence, and property damage during what the Garfield County sheriff called a “neighborhood disturbance.”


A neighbor, whom the Post didn’t identify, told the Garfield County Sheriff’s office that one of Boebert’s sons had been racing a dune buggy down their quiet residential street in Silt. "He's going like 50 miles an hour and this is a residential lane — there's kids," the neighbor told dispatchers. "We tried to stop him, and he'd just freakin' cuss at us and just left."

In a request for the sheriff, the neighbor said to dispatchers, "It's the Boeberts, if you know who the Boeberts are.”

“Our wonderful congresswoman," another voice sarcastically added in the background, per the audio of the 911 call. “I need a sheriff out here.”

As the neighbors clamored for police intervention, they expressed their fear of what Boebert would do to them, given the pro-Trump House Republican and her family’s obsession with guns.

“I'm sure [Jayson] loaded to the hilt,” a neighbor told the 911 dispatcher. “Do you know who his wife is? Lauren Boebert. She's loaded. They all have guns.”

After complaints about Boebert’s son, Jayson allegedly hopped into his pickup truck and ran over a neighbor’s mailbox, prompting a second neighbor to call 911.

“Stop, you jackass! Get the fuck out of here,” the second neighbor hollered during the call, apparently addressing Boebert. “Come on, man. What are you doing? What did we do wrong? I live here!”

Jayson “threatened everyone I know that’s standing here,” the first neighbor told police, per the Post. “He just got chest to chest, face to face, looking to fight.”

The Garfield County Sheriff, Lou Vallario, dispatched four deputies to the scene, but despite the property damage, no investigations or arrests were made.

“It was a neighborhood disturbance between a couple of neighbors regarding kids on ATVs,” Vallario told the Denver Post. “It sounds like Jayson got upset about the neighbor confronting his kids about their riding. When it was all said and done, they all agreed to work it out as neighbors. No charges. No further action.”

Distressed by Vallario’s inaction, America Muckrakers, a political action committee dedicated to booting Boebert from Congress, called on Colorado attorney general Phil Weiser, the local district attorney, and the Colorado Bureau of Investigations to investigate Boebert’s relationship with Vallario’s office, according to HuffPost.

“This was clearly a serious situation as there were two 911 calls, five deputies, and at least four families involved,” the head of American Muckrakers, David Wheeler, said in an email demanding the investigation, the Post reported.

The office of Colorado attorney general Phil Weiser said they were asked to look into the incident but didn’t confirm whether any investigation would take place, the Daily Mail reported Saturday.

The altercation wasn’t Jayson Boebert’s first reported run-in with law enforcement. In 2004, he pleaded guilty to “public indecency and lewd exposure” after exposing his genitals to two young women at a bowling alley in Rifle, Colorado.

Boebert, a gun-toting House freshman, has had a string of dust-ups with law enforcement herself, starting from her teenage years. She was arrested in 2010 after her two pitbulls attacked a neighbor’s dog.

The future congresswoman was arrested again in 2015 for disorderly conduct; in 2016 for careless driving and operating an unsafe vehicle after her truck ran into a ditch; and in 2017 for failing to appear for her court hearing.

Lauren Boebert's Shooters Grill Is Out Of Business

I have to warn you up front: If schadenfreude moves you emotionally, you might want to grab a few boxes of tissues. What were once unconfirmed reports are now confirmed: Colorado gun fetishist and dubious campaign finance garbage fire Lauren Boebert’s Shooters Grill in Rifle, Colorado, is out of business. The congresswoman has been on the forever MAGA campaign trail of late, promoting openly racist gun fetishists who pretend they are pro life.

On the one hand, this is not a surprise, as it was only a couple of weeks ago that Boebert told The Daily Beast that Shooters Grill’s lease had not been renewed. Boebert’s campaign finances have also seemed to have crossed potentially illegal paths with the business after one of her many wild campaign finance reports showed thousands of dollars being sent to the Grill’s address for unclear reasons.

On the other hand, most people not interested in eating around a bunch of crucifixes and guns didn’t enjoy Shooters Grill. And subsequently ratings on Yelp were disabled after “increased public attention” and a slew of reviews you never want to see associated with any place where food is served.


Boebert’s personal finances and her campaign finances have been a big question mark as her Federal Election Commission filings have been filled with pretty wild expenditure claims. One such claim, reported on last year, was that she reimbursed herself on her campaign travel costs to the tune of circumnavigating the earth.

Colorado’s Post Independent reports that while Shooters Grill is gone, Boebert still likes the idea of having a place to launder money plaster the “Shooters” moniker on. “We would just dramatically scale it back, because, obviously, we’re not in our building,” Boebert told the Independent. “It may look like a Shooters coffee shop with pastries and some easy breakfast sandwiches and merchandise.”

Like all things Boebert, the legend of Shooters Grill’s origin story is a lie:

The gun-theme came when someone was allegedly beaten to death in front of Shooters and Boebert’s employees started asking if they could open carry. It later turned out the man ostensibly beaten to death in fact died of methamphetamine overdose.

In fact, the man that Boebert claimed had been beaten to death in front of her establishment wasn’t even found dead anywhere near Shooters.

Reprinted with permission from Daily Kos.

Ostentatious Public Displays Of Prayer Promote Tribalism, Not Christianity

Just one week after declaring pregnancy a sacrament, the Supreme Court announced a bold ruling in favor of performative Christianity. Never mind this tiresome business about no establishment of religion, the very holy Republican majority in their priestly robes have liberated the nation’s public school football coaches to get on with the serious business of saving souls.

Can I get an amen?

The court ruled in favor of a coach in Bremerton, Washington who had lost his lawsuit against the school board that let him go after he refused to stop holding post-game prayer meetings with his players at the 50 yard-line after high school football games. The justices held that Coach Joseph Kennedy’s showboating for Jesus was exactly like “a Christian aide…praying quietly over her lunch in the cafeteria.”

As near as I can determine, the author of the decision, Trump appointee Neil Gorsuch, never attended a public school: a total academic hothouse flower. In her dissent, Justice Sonia Sotomayor whose life experience is considerably broader, took the rare step of attaching photos from the evidentiary record by way of demonstrating that what Gorsuch characterized as private devotional moments were, in fact, public spectacles.

She added that athletic coaches have considerable influence over their young charges: “Students look up to their teachers and coaches as role models and seek their approval,” she wrote.

“Students also depend on this approval for tangible benefits. Players recognize that gaining the coach’s approval may pay dividends small and large, from extra playing time to a stronger letter of recommendation to additional support in college athletic recruiting.”

If the coach holds a prayer session, what sophomore quarterback will feel free not to drop to his knees? And if he’s a Jew, a Muslim or a Hindu? As Jay Michaelson put it in The Daily Beast, such devotionals tend to be about “as official as a fire drill.”

Remember, this is a public school, not a private religious academy.

Here’s how a Republican-appointed justice at the Ninth Circuit described the evidence in rejecting the coach’s appeal: Coach Kennedy “prayed out loud in the middle of the football field” at game’s end, “surrounded by players, members of the opposing team, parents, a local politician and members of the news media with television cameras recording the event, all of whom had been advised of Kennedy’s intended actions through the local news and social media.”

Starting with the coach’s own Facebook page. In short, he staged a religious publicity stunt at a public high school where students are supposed to be free from government-sponsored proselytizing.

Here’s what Coach Kennedy’s Lord and Savior said about theatrical displays of religiosity in Matthew 5: 5-6: “And when you pray, you shall not be like the hypocrites. For they love to pray standing in the synagogues and at street-corners that they may be seen by men… But you, when you pray, go into your room, and when you have shut your door, pray to your Father…and your Father who sees in secret will reward you.”

No matter. Nothing more excites a certain kind of zealot more than ignoring the plain meaning of what they otherwise affirm as divinely-inspired scripture. Also, some pious exegete can no doubt be found who will construe the meaning of “your room” as “football stadium.”

Blessed are the linebackers, for they shall stand strong.

For the rest of us, the clear message of this dreary little episode is that in the United States Supreme Court, it’s not about facts and evidence. It’s about who’s got the votes. It’s as rigged as the College of Cardinals. If Justice Gorsuch describes a come-to-Jesus pep rally at a homecoming game as a quiet devotional, and if five of his like-minded colleagues agree, then ecclesiastical ceremonies can commence all across the country.

And no doubt they will, particularly in red states and rural communities where religious minorities already know their place. Because it’s only partly about religion to begin with. Mostly it’s about tribal identity: who belongs, who’s in charge, who’s a Real American, and who is merely tolerated. There is no chance—zero—that this Supreme Court would have ruled in favor of a religious minority.

And if you don’t like it, Pilgrim, well tough.

Christian nationalism is what it’s called, a perversion of both patriotism and faith. How you can tell is that Rep. Lauren Boebert (R-CO), the second-dumbest person in the U.S. Congress, is all excited about it.

As reported in the Denver Post, Boebert told a Colorado religious gathering “the church is supposed to direct the government. The government is not supposed to direct the church. That is not how our Founding Fathers intended it.”

She spoke of her disgust with “this separation of church and state junk that’s not in the Constitution. It was in a stinking letter,”

The stinking letter, of course, was written by Thomas Jefferson.

Lauren Boebert's Gun-Nut Grill Is Getting Evicted

For far-right Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado, owning a gun-themed restaurant called Shooters Grill has been a major promotional tool among fellow MAGA Republicans and members of the National Rifle Association (NRA). But according to Daily Beast reporter Roger Sollenberger, Boebert’s promotional tool may be in trouble: Sollenberger reports that Boebert’s restaurant is “facing an uncertain” future now that the new landlord of the property she has been renting has announced that he won’t be renewing her lease.

In an article published by the Beast on June 23, Sollenberger describes the property’s new landlord as a “marijuana retailer.”

“As it stands, the landlord has told Boebert he will revoke the restaurant’s lease at the end of August, and send Shooters packing,” Sollenberger reports. “The rest is up in the air. Boebert told The Daily Beast that she and her husband, Jayson Boebert, had been surprised to receive the notice last week announcing that their lease would not be renewed. The building’s ownership changed hands last month, she said, and now, Shooters would either have to find new digs or shut down for good.”

Sollenberger continues, “But the day after that notice arrived, an anti-Boebert political group somehow got word that the timeline was even tighter than that — two weeks, the group said, putting the possible ouster just days before Republicans hit the polls for primary day.”

Boebert’s far-right admirers in the MAGA movement have praised her for owning a restaurant, saying it shows that she isn’t part of the Washington, D.C. “elite.” But these are the same MAGA Republicans who have attacked progressive Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York City for having once worked as a bartender — a line of attack that was dumb even by MAGA standards. According to that MAGA logic, or lack thereof, owning a restaurant is respectable but tending bar is not.

Sollenberger notes that as of June 23, the Shooters Grill website is down — and that Boebert “didn’t explain exactly why her business was being kicked out” when interviewed by the Beast. According to Sollenberger, Boebert was undecided on how she would respond to the eviction.

“Boebert told The Daily Beast, at one point, that she and her husband were ‘at peace’ with ending their run, and did not plan to fight the order,” Sollenberger reports. “But as the plot thickened politically, she bought some time. Now, she says she’s entertaining two contradictory options: the original shutdown plan, or buying the building outright from the new owners. She won’t say which she and her husband are choosing until after the primary.”

Boebert’s far-right admirers in the MAGA movement have praised her for owning a restaurant, saying it shows that she isn’t part of the Washington, D.C. “elite.” But these are the same MAGA Republicans who have attacked progressive Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York City for having once worked as a bartender — a line of attack that was dumb even by MAGA standards. According to that MAGA logic, or lack thereof, owning a restaurant is respectable but tending bar is not.

Sollenberger notes that as of June 23, the Shooters Grill website is down — and that Boebert “didn’t explain exactly why her business was being kicked out” when interviewed by the Beast. According to Sollenberger, Boebert was undecided on how she would respond to the eviction.

“Boebert told The Daily Beast, at one point, that she and her husband were ‘at peace’ with ending their run, and did not plan to fight the order,” Sollenberger reports. “But as the plot thickened politically, she bought some time. Now, she says she’s entertaining two contradictory options: the original shutdown plan, or buying the building outright from the new owners. She won’t say which she and her husband are choosing until after the primary.”

Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

Behind The Sham Of Boebert’s ‘Small-Town Business Owner’ Image

Not unlike Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia and Rep. Madison Cawthorn of North Carolina, Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado is a far-right MAGA Republican who has gone out of her way to court controversy since being sworn into the U.S. House of Representatives in January 2021. The 35-year-old Boebert, a QAnon supporter and conspiracy theorist, is running on a pseudo-populist platform in her 2022 reelection campaign. But journalist Abigail Weinberg, in an article published by Mother Jones , demonstrates that Boebert’s image as a “straight-talking small-town business owner” is a sham.

“A close look at Boebert’s past reveals cracks in the narrative she’s built,” Weinberg explains. “And for several people who worked at her restaurant and know her personally, Boebert’s American dream has been more like a ‘nightmare.’”

Boebert owns Shooter’s Grill, a restaurant in Rifle, Colorado.

“Former Shooters employees tell me that, in the early years of Boebert’s fame, people visited the restaurant from across the country, and that the dining room was often packed with tourists on summer days,” Weinberg reports. “But they also say that the reality of working at Shooters was far removed from the lighthearted atmosphere shown on TV. In fact, five former Shooters employees tell me that Boebert frequently failed to pay her employees on time. Two of the former workers wished to remain anonymous because they feared retaliation; another did not want to be named and publicly associated with Boebert.”

A big part of Boebert’s hyper-MAGA narrative is that she had a tough working-class upbringing and that Democratic policies did nothing to help someone like her. But according to Weinberg’s sources, the Shooters owner has a history of not treating her employees well.

A former Shooters waitress told Weinberg, “The second the restaurant blew up, her head blew up — and it became something entirely different. And I got to meet a new version of her that is a monster.”

Weinberg reports, “Multiple employees say that they were paid in cash, either out of the register or from Boebert’s husband’s wallet, without any taxes deducted. While many workers were struggling to make ends meet, they say Boebert spent exorbitant sums on breast implants, private schooling for her sons, and a new Cadillac Escalade. They describe her as alternately absent, showing up only when news crews were at the restaurant, or demanding.”

Another former Shooters employee told Weinberg, “If she would come into the restaurant, everyone just knew we were just gonna have a bad day, because she would just walk around and nitpick.”

Josh Boyington, who worked as a cook at Shooters before leaving in 2017, alleges that Shooters was losing money in the late 2010s. Boyington told Weinberg, “Shooters don’t make no money. I left because I don’t even think we were topping $500 a day.”

Weinberg managed to get Boebert on the phone. But when the far-right MAGA congresswoman found out that Weinberg writes for Mother Jones, she hung up on her.

But Boyington was glad to talk to Weinberg, saying that while he agrees with many of Boebert’s right-wing views, he has issues with her as a person.

Boyington told Weinberg, “She’s an easy person to love if you don’t know her. It’s just, once you get to know her, you just don’t love her.”

Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

QAnon’s Takeover Of GOP Surging With 72 Candidates Pushing 'Pedophilia' Lies

The long-running gradual consumption of the Republican Party by the authoritarian QAnon conspiracy cult is nearing the terminal takeover phase: A recent survey by Grid found 72 Republican candidates with varying levels of QAnon affiliation. The most salient fact, however, is not only is the cult presence growing, but not a single Republican in any capacity can be found who either denounces the trend or works in any other way than in concert with it.

That reality is terrifying not just because QAnon has a long record of inspiring unhinged, violent behavior with its fantastically vile beliefs and rhetoric. Most of all, QAnon at its core is deeply eliminationist, with an agenda calling for the mass imprisonment and execution of mainstream Democrats for ostensibly running a global child-trafficking/pedophilia cult—which seamlessly fits the people being targeted by Fox News and mainstream Republicans as “groomers” for opposing the right-wing attacks on the LGTBQ community.

Grid’s survey was based on a review of “public records and reporting, social media posts, and campaign materials and events,” which its team of reporters used to identify and confirm QAnon-aligned candidates for public office in 2022. They found at least 78 of them in 26 states, all but six of them Republicans, mostly running against other Republicans in their state primaries.

“They’re running for governorships, secretaries of state, seats in the Senate and House, and in state legislatures,” the study says. “They have raised over $20 million this cycle — and over $30 million since 2018.” Its simple summary: “QAnon appears to be a growing political movement with increasing clout and significant mainstream appeal.”

The highest concentration of these candidates is in Arizona, which has 13 of them; Florida is a close second with 12, while California has 10 and Texas has six. Over a dozen of them are incumbents, including Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia and Lauren Boebert of Colorado. Another 14 serve at the state level, mostly in legislatures.

One of the incumbents, Arizona House member Mark Finchem, participated in the 2021 Capitol insurrection—as did several other QAnon candidates—and has been subpoenaed by the House January 6 committee.

Most of these candidates, indeed, have never held public office and have dubious (at best) records of achievement:

  • Shiva Ayyadurai, who has four degrees from MIT and is running for the Massachusetts governorship, runs a website claiming that he is the inventor of email.
  • Ryan Dark White, who’s running for a U.S. Senate seat in Maryland and goes by the name Dr. Jonathan Ambrose McGreevey, has also pleaded guilty to illegal weapons charges and to fraudulently obtaining more than 80,000 doses of opioids.
  • Carla Spaulding, a candidate seeking to be the GOP nominee to run against Democratic House whip Debra Wasserman Schultz for her Florida seat, pays herself a hefty $60,000 salary out of her campaign contributions while running up a six-figure campaign debt. Nonetheless, she has far outraised her Republican competitors for the nomination; she’s number three on Grip’s QAnon fundraising list.

As Grid notes, “Q himself may be on the ballot this year.” In Arizona, Ron Watkins—the longtime 8kun site administrator who is believed to have authored at least some of the “Q drops” that fueled the cult between 2017 and 2020—is running in for the U.S. House in Arizona’s 2nd Congressional District, though his candidacy is considered a long shot at best. Watkins vowed to raise $1 million for his bid, but so far appears only to have raised about $50,000.

In a rational world, QAnon would have shriveled up and blown away after all of its cherished predictions and beliefs about “the Storm” led by Donald Trump and his allies that would sweep up these evil pedophiles and put them in prison to await execution were completely demolished by the cold reality of Joe Biden’s win in the 2020 election. But instead, it kept spreading and growing, its fanaticism helping fuel the January 6 insurrection, and providing a driving force for the ongoing anti-democratic insurgency that has followed. In states like Oregon, it now fundamentally controls the Republican political apparatus.

QAnon reared its ugly head in the U.S. Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Ketanji Brown-Jackson. As Alex Shepard observed at The New Republic, much of the questioning from Republicans revolved around the core QAnon beliefs:

The Q-inspired pedophile smear is consuming Republican politics. “The phrase ‘child porn’ (or ‘pornography’ or ‘pornographer’)” was mentioned 165 times during Brown’s confirmation hearings, The Washington Post’s Dana Milbank tallied. “I’m not suggesting she likes what’s happening in child pornography,” Senator Lindsey Graham said Monday. But “she ha[d] a chance to impose a sentence that would deter [child pornography], and she chose not to.” Senator Josh Hawley, meanwhile, referenced QAnon in his own remarks. “Judge Jackson’s view is that we should treat everyone more leniently because more and more people are committing worse and worse child sex offenses,” he said, while also stating that “we’ve been told things like child pornography is actually all a conspiracy, it’s not real.” The lunatics who follow QAnon may just be onto something, in other words: The truth is out there.

Shepard also notes that there are concrete reasons for Republicans to permit themselves to be subsumed by an authoritarian cult: It polls well. “Nearly half of Republicans (49 percent) and 52 percent of Trump voters believe that Democrats run child sex-trafficking rings, per YouGov polling conducted during Jackson’s confirmation hearings,” he reports. “Even though only 18 percent of Republicans had a positive view of QAnon (compared to 16 percent of all respondents), 30 percent of all respondents believed that ‘top Democrats are involved in elite child sex-trafficking rings,’ suggesting the wide reach of the conspiracy theory.”

What all this tells us is that Democrats this fall will be facing a multipronged attack by Republicans, all based on hysterical fantasy: Democrats are soft on crime, they want to push critical race theory and “transgender ideology” on your kids, and they’re pro-pedophile. All three are designed to appeal to the lizard-brained lowest common denominators: the people inclined to violent eliminationism. Candidates should come prepared.

Is There Any Way To Isolate Political Extremists? Yes

There is probably no easy cure for the Marjorie Taylor Greene phenomenon. She's a repellent clown whose presence on the national stage has yielded nothing but degradation — except for the guffaw she afforded us when denouncing Nancy Pelosi's "Gazpacho police."

And she has lots of company. Her colleagues in the House include Paul Gosar and Matt Gaetz and Lauren Boebert and Louie Gohmert and, sigh, many more. And even among the members who probably do know the difference between the Nazi secret police and a summer soup, there are alarming numbers who are extremist-adjacent. There are, for example, more sitting GOP congressmen who voted not to certify the 2020 election than there are Republicans who voted for a resolution to support NATO.

Democrats are not immune to the extremism virus either. While the Democratic Party hasn't lost its bearings in the way the Republican Party has, it is skewed by its own zealots. In the 2020 presidential primaries, for example, progressive activists pushed candidates to impose a moratorium on deportations, to abolish private health insurance and to ban fracking, among other demands. Those issues weren't top of mind for average Democrats, let alone for average voters.

In the pre-Internet era, our political parties seemed to be bulwarks of stability. But that has long since ceased to be the case. Rather than forming, directing and discipling their members, these institutions have become hollow shells. Unable to control fundraising due to the rise of small-dollar, internet contributions, and stripped even of the formerly coveted power of attaching earmarks to legislation, the parties, as Yuval Levin has argued, are mere soapboxes that permit members to flaunt their personal brands.

The party duopoly empowers the most extreme voters and leaves the vast middle unrepresented and feeling that in general elections they must choose the lesser of two evils. As Katherine Gehl, founder of the Institute for Political Innovation, notes, about 10 percent of voters (those who vote in primaries) determine the outcome of 83 percent of congressional races. And because primary voters tend to be more ideological and extreme than others, candidates pander to them to get elected and then to remain in office. The term "primary" became a verb only in the last decade or so, as the power of the party zealots became a cudgel to use against any member who even considered compromising with the other party.

There's one more factor aggravating the lurch to extremism, at least among Republicans (Democrats have different rules), and that's the winner-take-all system in presidential primaries. In 2016, Donald Trump lost Iowa and then won New Hampshire with 35 percent of the vote. A solid majority, 57 percent, was divided among five other candidates.

So, are we doomed to be at the mercy of the mad and bad? It's possible, but then again, one reform that seems to be getting traction is ranked-choice voting (also known as instant runoff elections).

It's already the law in Alaska and Maine for state, congressional, and presidential contests and has been adopted by more than 20 cities. In Virginia, the Republican Party used a ranked-choice system to choose its gubernatorial candidate in 2021, with the result that Glenn Youngkin rather than Amanda Chase ("Trump in heels") secured the nomination. In New York City, predictions that the city's 5.6 million voters would find the ranked-choice system confusing were not borne out. Turnout was up compared with the last contested mayoral primary, and 95 percent of voters said the system was easy. There were no differences among ethnic groups in understanding the system, and the winner was a moderate former cop.

There are many different approaches to ranked-choice voting, and experimentation will determine which is best. But even with the small sample we have, we can judge that the incentives seem better. Among the three GOP senators who voted to confirm Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court, only one is up for reelection in 2022 — Lisa Murkowski of Alaska. Murkowski could uphold the norm of confirming the other party's qualified nominee and not fear a Trumpist primary challenger because Alaska now holds an open primary in which anyone from any party can participate. The four candidates who win the most votes go on to the general election. Voters rank their choices. If one candidate gets over 50 percent, he or she is the winner. If not, the bottom polling candidate is dropped, and the second choices on ballots are distributed, and so on until someone has a majority.

Not only does the ranked-choice system disempower party extremists; it also discourages candidates from savage personal attacks, the persistence of which arguably keeps some fine people out of politics altogether.

The two-party system has not proven to be a solid foundation for democracy. Time to disarm the crazies.

Mona Charen is policy editor of The Bulwark and host of the Beg to Differ podcast. Her most recent book is Sex Matters: How Modern Feminism Lost Touch with Science, Love, and Common Sense. To read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www.creators.com.

Lauren Boebert Declares War On Disney — And Loses Instantly

Lauren Boebert, the QAnon-backing gun-loving Republican United States Congresswoman from Colorado, has chimed into Florida GOP Governor Ron DeSantis's spat with Disney over his state's discriminatory "Don't Say Gay" legislation.

DeSantis and the entertainment giant have been at each other's throats since the corporation publicly condemned the "Parental Rights in Education" bill that DeSantis signed into law last week.

"Florida’s HB 1557, also known as the ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill, should never have passed and should never have been signed into law,” Disney said in a statement on March 28th. “Our goal as a company is for this law to be repealed by the legislature or struck down in the courts, and we remain committed to supporting the national and state organizations working to achieve that. We are dedicated to standing up for the rights and safety of LGBTQ+ members of the Disney family, as well as the LGBTQ+ community in Florida and across the country."

On Monday, Boebert made a prediction.

"Next year, the woke Disney lobbyists will ask Congress to extend Micky Mouse’s trademark," she tweeted. "I think not."

The Twitter community noticed some problems with Boebert's post.

It was all downhill from there.

Reprinted with permission from Alternet