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Cohen Book Hilariously Describes Trump Mocking And Deceiving Evangelical Leaders

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Michael Cohen's book about his years as Donald Trump's fixer is a clarion call to Christians to wake up and recognize that the man many of them revere as a heavenly agent is a religious fraud who loathes them and mocks their faith.

In Disloyal, published this week, Cohen shows how Trump is a master deceiver. He quotes Trump calling Christianity and its religious practices "bullshit," soon after he masterfully posed as a fervent believer. In truth, Cohen writes, Trump's religion is unbridled lust for money and power at any cost to others.


Cohen's insider stories add significant depth to my own documenting of Trump's repeated and public denouncements of Christians as "fools," "idiots," and "schmucks."

In extensive writing and speeches, Trump has declared that his life philosophy is "revenge." That stance is aggressively anti-Christian. So are Trump's often publicly expressed desires to violently attack others, mostly women, and his many remarks that he derives pleasure from ruining the lives of people over such minor matters as declining to do him a favor.

Cohen reinforces these facts with new anecdotes about Trump's utter disregard for other people and his contempt for religious belief. Cohen's words should shock the believers who were critical to his becoming president, provided they ever read them. By denouncing the book Trump has ensured that many of those he has tricked into believing he is a deeply religious man will never fulfill their Christian duty to be on the lookout for deceivers.

None of the evangelicals I have interviewed in the past five years knew that in writing Trump has denounced their beliefs and written of the communion host as "my little cracker."

Despite the irrefutable evidence that Trump detests Christianity and ridicules such core beliefs as the Golden Rule and turning the other cheek, America is filled with pastors who praise him to their flocks as a man of god. Trump himself has looked heavenward outside the White House to imply he was chosen by god.

Pastors who support Trump were scolded two years ago by Christianity Today, a magazine founded by Billy Graham, for not denouncing Trump as "profoundly immoral." Many evangelical pastors then attacked the magazine rather than following the Biblical incantation to examine their own souls.

Cohen writes that as a young man who grew up encountering Mafioso and other crooks at a country club he fell into the "trace like spell" of Trump, whom he describes as an utterly immoral, patriarchal mob boss and con man. Cohen says he was "an active oparticipant" in everything from Trump getting "golden showers" in Las Vegas to corrupt deals with Russian officials.

Trump is "consumed by the worldly lust for wealth and rewards," Cohen writes, which puts him at odds with the teaching of Jesus Christ about what constitutes a good life.

"Places of religious worship held absolutely no interest to him, and he possessed precisely zero personal piety in his life," Cohen writes.

Cohen explains that the only version of Christianity that could possibly interest Trump is the "prosperity gospel." That is a perverse belief that financial wealth is a sign of heavenly approval rooted in 19th Century occult beliefs that is anathema to Christian scripture.

Many actual Christians regard the prosperity gospel as evil. The evangelical magazine founded by Billy Graham, Christianity Today, calls it "an aberrant theology" promoted by such disgraced televangelists as Jimmy Swaggart and Jim and Tammy Baker.

Early in Trump's aborted 2012 presidential campaign, Cohen writes, he was ordered to reach out to faith communities. Soon Paula White, now the White House adviser on faith, proposed a meeting at Trump Tower with evangelical leaders. Cohen writes that Trump liked White because she was blonde and beautiful.

Cohen said that among those attending were Jerry Falwell Jr., who recently resigned in disgrace as head of Liberty University, and Creflo Dollar, who solicited donations for a $65 million corporate jet and who was criminally charged that year with choking his daughter. Dollar said those charges were the work of the devil.

Once the evangelical leaders took their seats, Cohen writes, Trump quickly and slickly portrayed himself as a man of deep faith. Cohen writes that this was nonsense

After soaking in Trump's deceptions, the leaders proposed laying hands on Trump, a religious affirmation of divine approval. Cohen was astounded when Trump, a germaphobe, eagerly accepted.

"If you knew Trump as I did, the vulgarian salivating over beauty contestants or mocking Roger Stone's" sexual proclivities, you would have a hard time keeping a straight face at the sight of him affecting the serious and pious mien of a man of faith. I knew I could hardly believe the performance or the fact that these folks were buying it," Cohen writes.

"Watching Trump I could see that he knew exactly how to appeal to the evangelicals' desires and vanities – who they wanted him to be, not who he really was. Everything he was telling them about himself was absolutely untrue."

To deceive the evangelicals, Cohen writes, Trump would "say whatever they wanted to hear."

Trump's ease at deception became for Cohen an epiphany, though a perverse one.

In that moment, Cohen writes, he realized the boss would someday become president because Trump "could lie directly to the faces of some of the most powerful religious leaders in the country and they believed him."

Later that day, Cohen writes, he met up with Trump in his office.

"Can you believe that bullshit," Trump said of the laying on of hands. "Can you believe that people believe that bullshit."

Cohen also writes about Trump's desire, expressed behind closed doors, to destroy those who offend him. Trump has said the same, though less vividly, in public.

"I love getting even," Trump declared in his book Think Big, espousing his anti-Christian philosophy. "Go for the jugular. Attack them in spades!"

He reiterated that philosophy this year at the National Prayer Breakfast. Holding up two newspapers with banner headlines reporting his Senate acquittal on impeachment charges, Trump said, "I don't like people who use their faith as justification for doing what they know is wrong. Nor do I like people who say, 'I pray for you,' when they know that that's not so."

Trump spoke after Arthur Brooks, a prominent conservative, told the breakfast meeting that "contempt is ripping our country apart."

Mr. Brooks went on: "We're like a couple on the rocks in this country…Ask God to take political contempt from your heart. And sometimes, when it's too hard, ask God to help you fake it."

Everyone in the room rose to applaud Brooks except Trump, though he finally stood up as the applause died down, rose.

Taking the microphone, Trump said, "Arthur, I don't know if I agree with you… I don't know if Arthur is going to like what I'm going to say."

Trump then said he didn't believe in forgiveness. That is just as Cohen wrote: "Trump is not a forgiving person." Trump's words at the prayer breakfast made clear that he rejects the teaching of Jesus at Luke 6:27: "Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you."

The question pastors should raise in their Sunday sermons, the question Cohen'sbook lays before them, is how can any Christian support a man who mocks Christianity, embraces revenge as his only life philosophy, and rejects that most basic Biblical teaching– forgiveness.

Leaked Details From Michael Cohen's Shocking Trump Memoir

Revealing details of Michael Cohen's forthcoming book were reported over the weekend after The Washington Post obtained a copy.

"President Trump's longtime lawyer and personal fixer, Michael Cohen, alleges in a new book that Trump made 'overt and covert attempts to get Russia to interfere in the 2016 election' and that the future commander in chief was also well aware of Cohen's hush-money payoff to adult-film star Stormy Daniels during that campaign," according to the Post.

The former Trump lawyer's book, titled Disloyal: A Memoir, will be released on Tuesday. It recounts dozens of stunning and occasionally salacious episodes, notably explaining Trump's connection with the Kremlin.

Trump admired Vladimir Putin, writes Cohen, because he wrongly believed that the Russian president is " the richest man in the world by a multiple." Trump loved Putin, Cohen wrote, "because the Russian leader had the ability 'to take over an entire nation and run it like it was his personal company — like the Trump Organization, in fact.

"Trump's sycophantic praise of the Russian leader during the 2016 campaign began as a way to suck up and ensure access to the oligarch's money after he lost the election," the Post reports. But Cohen says Trump also believed that Putin's hatred Hillary Clinton, which dated back to her support for the 2011 protest movement in Russia, "could strengthen Trump's hand in the United States."

Cohen also disclosed details of the plans for Trump Tower Russia — and notes that Ivanka Trump was deeply involved in the project.

"Cohen says the Trump Tower plans called for a 120-story building in Red Square, including 30 floors devoted to a five-star hotel with an Ivanka Trump-branded spa and Trump restaurants, and 230 high-end condominiums for Russian oligarchs and leaders," reported the Post. "Ivanka Trump, the president's daughter, who is now a senior White House adviser, even selected the proposed tower's high-end finishes."

Cohen also says that Trump admired apartheid-era South Africa, ridiculed his own evangelical supporters, mocked Nelson Mandela and Barack Obama in racist terms, rand shared his overly enthusiastic admiration for Cohen's then-15-year-old daughter.

"Look at that piece of ass," Trump reportedly said. "I would love some of that."



In New Ad, Michael Cohen Warns Against Believing Anything Trump Says

"You don't have to like me but please, listen to me."

Nobody knows Donald Trump and the inner machinations of his criminal organization like Michael Cohen, the convicted felon and former attorney who served as Trump's "fixer" for more than a decade. Now the repentant Cohen, released from prison and about to publish a scathing memoir that Trump attempted to suppress, appears in a new political ad timed for the Republican National Convention.

Cohen forthrightly admits his own role in the deception and deviance that helped Trump win in 2016 -- and he warns against being the gullible fools that his old boss laughingly assumes we all are.

Not funny, but vital. Share it.


House Ethics Committee Unanimously Rebukes Rep. Gaetz Over Misconduct

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

The House Committee on Ethics announced in a report released Friday it had voted unanimously to admonish U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz, Republican of Florida, over a tweet he sent which some saw as an attempt to intimidate a witness ahead of his testimony before Congress.

The Ethics Committee reviewed "allegations that Representative Gaetz sought to threaten, intimidate, harass, or otherwise improperly influence the President's former attorney, Michael Cohen, in connection with Mr. Cohen's testimony before a congressional committee."

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