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Tag: mike lindell

MyPillow Guy Issues Trump-Style Threat Against Salon Reporter For Exposing Him

Reprinted with permission from DailyKos

.Over the weekend, MyPillow Guy Mike Lindell went on a frightening tirade against Salon reporter Zachary Petrizzo. Apparently Petrizzo had the temerity to write some critical stories about Lindell, which drove the MyPillow Guy to brand that reporter as "an enemy of our country."

This happened on an edition of Lindell's livestream "news" channel, "The Lindell Report." Petrizzo got a clip.



Lindell told his co-host that he was "going after" Petrizzo for two articles Petrizzo recently published about him. One was about how Lindell sold off a MyPillow corporate jet to defend himself against a billion-dollar lawsuit filed against him by Dominion Voting Systems. The other was about the millions he spent paying so-called experts to find "evidence" to support his baseless claims of election fraud. He also helped buy a luxury home in tony Naples, Florida for one of those "experts," Dennis Montgomery—the man whose supposed "packet captures" were discredited by Lindell's own investigators.

In other words, Petrizzo was actually practicing journalism. And Lindell wasn't happy about it. He told his audience that he intended to spend "a lot more money" to "go after this kid," whom he declared "an enemy of our country."

Anyone who has been paying attention over the years should be concerned. Lindell has effectively called a Code Red on Petrizzo. Let's call this for what it is—another in a long list of cases of stochastic terrorism from Trump acolytes. Somebody, either Salon or some other party, needs to see to Petrizzo's safety if they haven't already done so.


Twitter Lights Up Trump Supporters With ‘Reinstatement’ Burns

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

Loyalists and supporters of former President Donald Trump were relentlessly mocked for believing the former disgraced president would be reinstalled and somehow resume his former duty of President of the United States.

For months now, Trump supporters have been pushing a bizarre baseless theory suggesting he would be reinstated as president on Friday, August 13.

On a number of previous occasions, MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell raved about the so-called new world order date. "The morning of August 13 it'll be the talk of the world, going, 'Hurry up! Let's get this election pulled down, let's right the right, let's get these communists out, you know, that have taken over,'" Lindell previously said.


However, that date has come and gone. Nothing has changed.Veteran news anchor Dan Rather and MSNBC's Joy Reid did not miss the date on the calendar nor the opportunity to highlight the latest error where Trump is concerned.

Rather wrote, "My bad. I completely forgot to mark #reinstatementday on my calendar. What did I miss?"


Reid said, "So who's got tickets to the Trump re-inauguration and what are y'all planning to wear??? #TrumpReinstatement."

In response to their tweets, many other social media users also joined in on the mocking as they took direct aim at Lindell for circulating the baseless conspiracy theory. One Twitter user wrote, "I asked Mike Lindell what time and where the reinstatement would be. He responded that he was praying for me and that I was full of hate. I will note, for the record, that he would not reveal reinstatement details."








The Lincoln Project also didn't miss the opportunity to mock Trump. With their tweet, they also created a parody website reiterating the former president's status.




Trump Restoration Prophecy Failed, But His Cultists Still Believe

Friday, August 13, 2021, according to far-right conspiracy theorist and MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, was supposed to be "Reinstatement Day" — the day in which Donald Trump would be reinstated as president when evidence demonstrated that widespread voter fraud occurred in the 2020 election. But that evidence doesn't exist, Lindell's wacky conspiracy theories have been debunked by cybersecurity experts — and as of Friday morning, August 13, Joe Biden is still the democratically elected president of the United States and Kamala Harris is still vice president. Even if the non-existent evidence of election fraud appeared, there would still be no mechanism for returning Trump to power.

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MyPillow Guy’s Election ‘Bombshell’ Blows Up In His Face

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell has been one of the most prominent public figures still passionately pushing the lie that former President Donald Trump won the 2020 election — and claiming that he can prove it. He even claimed Trump would be reinstated this month, a prediction he now disavows. His misinformation campaign came to a head this week as he held a so-called "cyber symposium" in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, to make the case that President Joe Biden was illegitimately elected. But as the shambolic event stretched into its second day, the keystone of his repeatedly debunked argument turned out — unsurprisingly — to be a complete dud.

Lindell claimed that he would provide data conclusively showing that China rigged the vote counts to install Biden as president. But The Washington Times, a conservative news outlet, reported Wednesday evening that the "expert" who was supposed to assess this evidence admitted it didn't hold up to scrutiny.

The paper explained:

Mr. Lindell said he had 37 terabytes of "irrefutable" evidence that hackers, who he said were backed by China, broke into election systems and switched votes in favor of President Biden. The proof, he said, is visible in intercepted network data or "packet captures" that were collected by hackers and could be unencrypted to reveal that a cyberattack occurred and that votes were switched.
But Mr. Lindell's lead cyber expert, Josh Merritt, told The Washington Times that packet captures are unrecoverable in the data and that the data, as provided, cannot prove a cyberincursion by China.
"So our team said, we're not going to say that this is legitimate if we don't have confidence in the information," Mr. Merritt said on Wednesday, the second day of the symposium.

Brad Heath, a reporter who closely followed the post-election litigation, noted:

Merrit was previously the subject of mockery after Sidney Powell misrepresented him in her post-election lawsuits that sought to overturn the result. The Washington Post reported in December 2020:

Powell describes Spyder in court filings as a former "Military Intelligence expert," and his testimony is offered to support one of her central claims. In a declaration filed in four states, Spyder alleges that publicly available data about server traffic shows that voting systems in the United States were "certainly compromised by rogue actors, such as Iran and China."
Spyder, it turns out, is Joshua Merritt, a 43-year-old information technology consultant in the Dallas area. Merritt confirmed his role as Powell's secret witness in phone interviews this week with The Washington Post.
Records show that Merritt is an Army veteran and that he enrolled in a training program at the 305th Military Intelligence Battalion, the unit he cites in his declaration. But he never completed the entry-level training course, according to Meredith Mingledorff, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence, which includes the battalion.
"He kept washing out of courses," said Mingledorff, citing his education records. "He's not an intelligence analyst."
In an interview, Merritt maintained that he graduated from the intelligence training program. But even by his own account, he was only a trainee with the 305th, at Fort Huachuca in Arizona, and for just seven months more than 15 years ago.
...
Merritt acknowledged that the declaration's description of his work as an "electronic intelligence analyst under 305th Military Intelligence" is misleading. He said it should have made clear that his time in the 305th was as a student, not as a working intelligence expert.

Zachary Petrizzo, a reporter for Salon, noted that the crowd at the symposium was thinning out on its second day, apparently from lack of enthusiasm about the content.

Even Steve Bannon, a close ally of Lindell's, was critical on Wednesday about the symposium's lack of evidence.

"You've laid a theory of the case out here that's very powerful, but in laying that case out, you've got to bring the receipts," he said.

Steve Bannon slams Mike Lindell's 'cyber symposium' www.youtube.com

To top off the rest of Lindell's terrible day, the judge overseeing the defamation case against him and other defendants brought by the Dominion voting maching company issued a ruling allowing the lawsuit to proceed and rejecting his motion to dismiss.

MyPillow Guy Now Denies Predicting Trump Will Return In August

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell has promised, more than once, that former President Donald Trump will be restored to the White House this month. When Vice interviewed the far-right figure on Monday, however, he vehemently denied having said that. But videos show otherwise.

This week, Lindell is holding a "Cyber Symposium" in South Dakota that he claims will proveTrump really won the 2020 election and was the victim of widespread voter fraud. But such evidence does not exist. The conspiracy theory that the election was stolen from Trump has been repeatedly debunked, and now-President Joe Biden defeated him by more than seven million in the popular vote.

When Vice asked Lindell about his claim that Trump will be restored as president sometime in August, he angrily ranted, "Nobody said that, nobody said that, nobody said that, nobody said that, nobody said that, nobody said that, OK? I think this interview is over."

Vice's David Gilbert, however, shared videos showing that Lindell did, in fact, make that claim.

During an interview for Steve Bannon's podcast in March, Lindell predicted, "Donald Trump will be back in office in August." And in July, Lindell said that by August 13, it will be "the talk of the world" when the 2020 election is "pulled down" and "communists" are removed from the White House:

Gilbert observes, "Lindell has been a pretty busy guy over the last few months, dealing with a $1.3 billion lawsuit brought by voting machine company Dominion for Lindell's non-stop and baseless accusations of fraud against the company. He has also produced two conspiracy-filled documentaries about election fraud. And let's not forget he launched a 'free-speech' social network called FrankSpeech, which no one uses. So, he may simply have forgotten that he told former senior Trump adviser Steve Bannon as far back as March that Trump would be returned to the White House in August."

Although dismissed as a bad joke by Lindell's critics, his Cyber Symposium has received a great deal of attention from far-right conspiracy theorists.

"Lindell's Cyber Symposium has been widely hyped in right-wing and extremist circles as the moment of reckoning for those who dismiss election fraud conspiracies," Gilbert explains. "But the event will produce nothing of value except more disinformation fodder for the same right-wing outlets that have supported his baseless and conspiratorial rhetoric for the last eight months."

Although Lindell's event is not open to the public, it is being live-streamed on the internet.

#EndorseThis: Lindell Loses It When CNN Says His 'Proof' Is 'Completely Ridiculous'

MyPillow CEO and deranged election conspiracist Mike Lindell has been been on the warpath since Donald Trump lost the 2020 election, spending millions of dollars to find "proof" that somehow, someway Trump won. But his proof is much like Lindell himself: "completely ridiculous."

During an interview with CNN reporter Drew Griffin, Lindell claimed to have "one piece of 1.2 billion lines of data from the election, OK? Within that will be timestamps when it happened, there'll be flips in there."

CNN talked with nine top cybersecurity experts who said it was "completely ridiculous" and "proof of nothing," as well as counh ty election officials of both parties who confirmed that Lindell's Chinese cyber-hacking conspiracy was literally impossible -- because their voting systems aren't linked to the Internet.

Lindell lost it: "He said that's nothing, huh? Then you didn't hire a cyber expert."

Watch the train wreck below:

Reporter baffled after Mike Lindell shows him 'evidence of nothing' in train wreck interview www.youtube.com

MyPillow Conspiracy Guy Pulls Ads From Fox News

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

MyPillow CEO and conspiracy theorist Mike Lindell is reportedly pulling his company's ads from Fox News after the network allegedly rejected an advertisement for his cyber symposium scheduled for mid-August. As The Wall Street Journal reported, Lindell "has said the symposium will prove the 2020 election was stolen from then-President Donald Trump through manipulation of election machines."

MyPillow is Fox News' single largest advertiser, after other companies have dropped ads over the years due to the network's bigotry and conspiracy theories.

Media Matters President Angelo Carusone laid out the details, including that MyPillow accounted for 18 percent of all ads on Fox News' Tucker Carlson Tonight in the first half of 2021. In 2020, there were periods when MyPillow accounted for 41 percent of that show's ad inventory.

As Carusone noted, the situation on Fox News prime time is so dire that Fox Corporation, the channel's parent company, is one of the largest paid advertisers. And now that situation goes from bad to worse, with MyPillow apparently dropping out.

(Also, for the record: MyPillow is not the only Fox News prime-time advertiser steeped in controversy. The Federal Trade Commission has charged that Balance of Nature, another top advertiser on Fox, made bogus claims that its products could ward off the coronavirus. As Media Matters has reported, such ads featured prominent right-wing media personalities, including current California gubernatorial candidate Larry Elder.)

Fox Welcomed Lindell's Deranged Conspiracy Theories — Until Now

As Media Matters and others have documented since his rise to prominence in right-wing circles during the Trump years, Lindell is a major backer of extremist conspiracy theories, ranging from calling COVID-19 vaccines the "mark of the beast" to claiming that Trump won the 2020 presidential election in a landslide (including in California).

Lindell is now trying to "prove" that the election was stolen from Trump by hosting what he calls a "cyber symposium" in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in mid-August. He's been lashing out at Fox News recently for not promoting the event, telling Salon's Zachary Petrizzo a week ago that he was going to force the issue by placing ads on the network.

One such ad that Petrizzo highlights:

Lindell Ad, Fox News - SALON.COM www.youtube.com

Ironically, Lindell has been welcome on Fox News until recently. Even after Tucker Carlson derided Sidney Powell's "Kraken" conspiracy theories about the election (and even after the January 6 attack), the Fox host still welcomed Lindell on his show to push the very same conspiracy theories.

As my colleague Matt Gertz wrote in February:

Since Lindell lost access to Twitter, Fox, Newsmax, and OAN have all eagerly provided him with access to their audiences. Fox star Tucker Carlson hosted him on the evening of his banning, giving the MyPillow CEO a sympathetic platform to push his Dominion conspiracy theories. In fact, Carlson, whose show's commercial blocks are a barren wasteland overwhelmingly reliant on the pillow company's advertisements, has repeatedly given Lindell pathetically sycophantic treatment.

Right-wing media have certainly welcomed the pillowman's money, and many of them are apparently still going to do the same when it comes to this ad. Just look anywhere and you'll see the sycophantic treatment, from Steve Bannon to Infowars to One America News Network to Newsmax to many others. But it's Fox News that has given Lindell his biggest perch -- and now it is reaping what it has sowed.

Fox news can't get enough of pillow czar Mike Lindell www.youtube.com

MyPillow Guy’s Firm Damaged By Failed Mask Venture

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell's botched mask venture has become a bottomless pit of losses that he still has not yet recovered from. During a phone interview with The Daily Beast, the controversial CEO and Trump ally detailed the financial strain he is now facing as a result of the failed venture which has cost him millions.

Back in March of 2020, Lindell announced plans to create and donate cloth masks to frontline workers. However, that plan quickly hit a wall as cloth masks did not meet the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria for face coverings. The issues did not stop there. As the months progressed, Lindell was faced with an even bigger problem.

Now, the CEO is stuck will millions of face coverings his company cannot get rid of. With many states becoming more lenient where face coverings are concerned, the demand for masks has slightly decreased since the onset of the pandemic. "I can't give them away," Lindell said during the interview this week "I tried to. No one wants the things anymore."

The controversial CEO reportedly claims to have reconstructed his company's manufacturing line so it could produce cloth masks. Now, the equipment and machinery acquired for mask-making just sit in a corner collecting dust and serving no purpose. Since Lindell was only able to dump a meager five percent of the mask inventory, he is still stuck with more than $7 million in useless cloth.

"All of a sudden, there was masks everywhere, almost as if the industry knew it was coming and waited for prices to go up," Lindell said. "Now I probably got $7 million out of my pocket that we're just stuck with."

As a devout MAGA supporter who devolved into an anti-masker, Lindell's decision to speak with the publication does come as a bit of a surprise.

He also admitted that he believed the publication would "unfairly spin his mask enterprise as a 'failure.'" But despite the botched venture and his abrupt about-face on masks, he attempted to defend his mask products as he insisted "it helped so many people back then."