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Polls In Texas And Missouri Show Suburban Swing Away From Trump

A spate of polls in a trio of suburban House seats come with bad news for Donald Trump and his chances at winning reelection in November.

Internal polls from Democratic candidates have Trump losing to Democratic nominee Joe Biden in three seats Trump carried in 2016, showing his standing with suburban voters is sliding and threatening to sink his bid.

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Shifting Suburban Vote May Help Democrats Win Swing States

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Political strategists divide U.S. voters geographically into three main categories: (1) urbanites, (2) rural voters, and (3) suburbanites. Urbanites lean reliably Democrat, while rural voters are a crucial part of the Republican base — and suburbia is full of swing voters. Reporter Zack Stanton, in an article published in Politico this week, discusses the Democratic Party's pursuit of female suburban voters and why "the 2020 election is the story of suburban women."

"What demographers are noticing is that America's suburbs are growing and becoming more diverse," Stanton explains. "And that is contributing to a massive political shift that is remaking the electoral map in lasting ways."

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Trump’s Suburban Support Collapses Into Gender Chasm

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Remember when all we ever heard about were former Democrats who defected to vote for Donald Trump in 2016? Would they really stick with Trump? Could Democrats ever win them back? Political reporters spent a solid three years perseverating over nothing but disaffected Democrats who might be permanently wed to the GOP moving forward.

Well, good news—political reporters are now looking elsewhere for their dog-bites-man electoral stories. The new shiny objects of 2020 are the once reliably pro-Republican suburbs turning on Trump. As we saw in the 2018 midterms, if enough college-educated GOP voters run toward Democrats, they can neutralize and, in some critical states, more than offset non-college white Democrats who gravitated toward Trump in 2016.

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