The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow explains how amazing it is that Virginia’s Republicans found candidates further to the right than Ken Cuccinelli, who in 2010 had the breast on the state’s seal covered up. Thursday night she did a devastating dissection of the dank corner of the Republican Party typified by the Virginia GOP’s candidate for lieutenant governor — E.W. Jackson, the man who was forced to hold a press conference this week to say, “I do not believe birth defects are caused by parents’ sin. And I do not believe yoga leads to Satanism.”

Maddow summarized:

“This is really what the Republican Party is like right now. Even after the 2012 elections, and the supposed nationwide tip-to-tail diagnosis that the party needed to rebrand, maybe take it a little easy on the fire and brimstone hot sauce, at least for the next few elections—even after all of that, this is who they are. They are more like this now than they were last year, and than they were the year before that. This is not the Beltway-narrative media about what’s going on in American politics right now, but it is exactly what is going on, if you watch how they behave and who they are and what they say in public.”

She concluded by saying, “Because this is how things are now. People keep saying this problem is in the past for the Republican Party. It’s not in the past, it’s worse than it’s ever been.”

Screen Shot 2013-06-14 at 2.32.46 PM

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

A scene from "Squid Game" on Netflix

Reprinted with permission from Responsible Statecraft

The Treasury Department's nine-page "2021 Sanctions Review" released on Monday makes vague recommendations for "calibrating sanctions to mitigate unintended economic, political, and humanitarian impact." Unfortunately, it offers few tangible policy suggestions on how to end the high humanitarian
Keep reading... Show less

Mt.Rushmore

Reprinted with permission from Creators

In New York City, a statue of Thomas Jefferson has graced the City Council chamber for 100 years. This week, the Public Design Commission voted unanimously to remove it. "Jefferson embodies some of the most shameful parts of our country's history," explained Adrienne Adams, a councilwoman from Queens. Assemblyman Charles Barron went even further. Responding to a question about where the statue should go next, he was contemptuous: "I don't think it should go anywhere. I don't think it should exist."

When iconoclasts topple Jefferson, they seem to validate the argument advanced by defenders of Confederate monuments that there is no escape from the slippery slope. "First, they come for Nathan Bedford Forrest and then for Robert E. Lee. Where does it end? Is Jefferson next? Is George Washington?"

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}