This Week In Polls: Iowa, Iowa, Iowa!

This Week In Polls: Iowa, Iowa, Iowa!

It’s the Friday evening before the Iowa caucuses. And the polls show that everyone will be in for a roller-coaster ride.

DEMOCRATS

As the Iowa caucuses go down to the wire on the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton is in the lead — but there’s room for a surprise.

The PPP numbers also ask a very crucial follow-up question of O’Malley supporters.

A short explanation: With the way Democratic caucuses actually work, with voters standing together in crowds at the local precincts, there is also a rule that a grouping must reach 15 percent of the assembly in order to be deemed “viable” and be able to elect delegates to the later county Democratic convention (which will elect delegates to the state convention — which will then ultimately elect delegates to the national convention.)

With O’Malley at only 7 percent statewide, it’s likely his supporters would fail to meet the 15 percent thresholds across the many local precincts. So which of the big two candidates would they support? The answer is 57 percent for O’Malley, to only 27 percent for Clinton. If that were to pan out, Sanders could net another 2 to 3 percentage points against Clinton on Monday.

REPUBLICANS

The GOP side has a different headache — not for uncertainty, but because of who looks like they’re definitely ahead. Here, the polls show a clear leader in Iowa: Donald Trump.

In all of these polls on the Republican side, no other candidates can get over even 5 percent.

Photo: U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a veteran’s rally in Des Moines, Iowa January 28, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

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