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Former Mueller aide Andrew Weissmann

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

The name Andrew Weissmann might ring a bell.

He's a former top Mueller attorney who worked with the Special Counsel on the Russia report.

Today he is an MSNBC legal analyst.

He also just wrote a book, an insider's view of the Mueller Investigation.


It's safe to say he knows what he's talking about when it comes to Trump and Russia.

Weissmann weighed in on the New York Times bombshell report that finds, among other staggering facts, that in 2016 and 2017 President Donald Trump paid just $750 in federal taxes.

It also finds Trump paid zero in taxes for 15 out of 20 years.

And it finds that Trump is in debt, to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars to an unknown entity. $421 million in debt, and the bill is coming due in the next few years.

Weissmann strongly suggests that entity is Russia.


Before that he served as general counsel of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and later became the chief of the criminal fraud section of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ).

Decades ago Weissmann served for over ten years as an assistant U.S. attorney in the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York, prosecuting Mafia crime families. After that he was put in charge of a special task force investigating the Enron scandal.

Last year NPR called him "the architect of the case against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort."

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