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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

In 1962 Rachel Carson published the seminal work Silent Spring, an indictment of the agricultural industry for its careless use of dangerous pesticides, and a touchstone text for the nascent environmentalist movement. Today congressional Republicans are threatening to repeal EPA rules on carbon emissions, and leaders fail not only to address the problem of climate change, but to even admit it exists. Earth Day is this week; Carson’s imperative to protect our planet is more urgent than ever.

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Supreme Court

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The right-wing freakout over peaceful protests outside the homes of Supreme Court justices and chalk on the sidewalk in front of Republican senators’ homes, built around the seeming belief that any kind of protest at all is an act of violence, is actually a piece of classic right-wing projection. Conservatives assume that all protests feature intimidation and menace, bellicose threats, and acts of violence, because they themselves know no other way of protesting, as we’ve seen over the past five years and longer—especially on Jan. 6.

So it’s not surprising that the right-wing response to protests over the imminent demise of the Roe v. Wade ruling so far is riddled with white nationalist thugs turning up in the streets, and threats directed at Democratic judges. Ben Makuch at Vice reported this week on how far-right extremists are filling Telegram channels with calls for the assassination of federal judges, accompanied by doxxing information revealing their home addresses.

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Marjorie Taylor Greene

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Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) is pushing a new conspiracy theory centered around the food and baby formula shortage currently plaguing the United States.

During a recent appearance on the far-right broadcast InfoWars, the Republican lawmaker echoed the bizarre claims of conspiracy theorists as she suggested that Democratic lawmakers are responsible for torching food facilities to create shortages. According to Rolling Stone, the latest theories appear to be based on ordinary fires that actually do occur.

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