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Reprinted with permission from Alternet

This is just getting tiresome.

After repeatedly humiliating himself in an attempt to defend his false claim on Sunday that Alabama was among the states that “will most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated” by Hurricane Dorian — a claim quickly refuted by government experts — President Donald Trump shared a map \ Wednesday night on Twitter that he claimed vindicated him. (This was a different map than the one he showed in the Oval Office, which had apparently been clumsily falsified, seemingly with a Sharpie.)

But this new attempt to defend his mistake didn’t actually help. The map was from Aug. 28, as the map itself showed, long before Trump’s false claim on Sept. 1, at which point the forecast had changed and become more precise.

And the text at the bottom of the map even further undermined Trump’s defense.

That text revealed that the prediction apparently came from the South Florida Water Management District and that the National Hurricane Center would “supersede” its predictions.

It even adds: “If anything on this graphic causes confusion, ignore the entire product.”

And, as we know, the predictions had tightened by Sunday when Trump made his false claim about Alabama. Even after the National Weather Service corrected him, Trump refused to back down from his false claim, even though the very evidence he’s now citing says he should have done exactly that.

Photo by Mediamodifier from Pixabay

Reprinted with permission from TomDispatch

When it rains, pieces of glass, pottery, and metal rise through the mud in the hills surrounding my Maryland home. The other day, I walked outside barefoot to fetch one of my kid's shoes and a pottery shard stabbed me in the heel. Nursing a minor infection, I wondered how long that fragment dated back.

A neighbor of mine found what he said looked like a cartridge case from an old percussion-cap rifle in his pumpkin patch. He told us that the battle of Monocacy had been fought on these grounds in July 1864, with 1,300 Union and 900 Confederate troops killed or wounded here. The stuff that surfaces in my fields when it storms may or may not be battle artifacts, but it does remind me that the past lingers and that modern America was formed in a civil war.

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