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Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Can a scorned President Donald Trump be trusted with the United States' national secrets after leaving office next year? It's a question floating around as the embattled president wages war on not only the Democratic Party but also certain elements of his own party.

Former Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) officer David Priess and other former intelligence officials are warning President-elect Joe Biden to forego the country's longstanding tradition of briefing the former president on international developments due to the potential threat he may pose after exiting the White House.


According to NBC News, Jack Goldsmith, who served as a senior U.S. Department of Justice official under the George W. Bush administration, expressed concern about Trump compared to past presidents who have left the office.

"This is not something that one could have ever imagined with other presidents, but it's easy to imagine with this one," said Goldsmith.

He went on to explain why Trump poses a threat based on his past behavior. The president's negotiation skills also raise questions about what he could do to potentially wreak havoc or promote his own agenda.

"He's shown as president that he doesn't take secret-keeping terribly seriously," Goldsmith said in an interview. "He has a known tendency to disrespect rules related to national security. And he has a known tendency to like to sell things that are valuable to him."

With the possible criminal charges Trump could face after leaving office in addition to the ailing hotel industry due to pandemic-related challenges, there is speculation Trump could be faced with financial challenges which could make him more "vulnerable to foreign influence."

In his book titled, "The President's Book of Secrets" which discusses former presidents and government intelligence, Priess noted that Trump most certainly poses a risk.

"Is that a risk?" Priess wrote. "If it were someone applying for a security clearance, damn right it would be a risk."

While most presidents have made profits after leaving the White House, none have had international ties like Trump does which poses more of a risk.

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Reprinted with permission from Creators

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Reprinted with permission from Alternet

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