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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Photo by The White House

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

President Donald Trump didn't seem to be expecting to be directly challenged on his wild dishonesty on Thursday.

While he was taking questions in the White House press briefing room, a reporter was unusually blunt with the president.

"After three and a half years, do you regret at all all of the lying you've done to the American people?" HuffPost reporter S.V. Dáte asked.


"All of the what?" Trump asked, not yet catching on.

"All of the lying. All of the dishonesty," Dáte responded.

"And who is that?" Trump asked.

"That you have done," the reporter repeated.

Trump had no response. "Uh…" he said, quickly pointing to another reporter to move on. That reporter, too, seemed caught off-guard, and Trump had to urge him repeatedly to ask a question.

Watch the exchange below:



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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons, a novel and a memoir. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Donald Trump

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New details about the direct role that Donald Trump played in developing a strategy to overturn the 2020 election were revealed in a federal court filing from election coup attorney John Eastman late Thursday.

Eastman is several months into a battle to keep records of his work for Trump in the run-up to January 6 confidential. but in his latest parry to bar access to emails he says should be protected under attorney-client privilege, he has revealed that Trump sent him at least “two hand-written notes” containing information “he thought might be useful for the anticipated litigation” challenging election results.

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