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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Shareblue.com

 

Still stinging from a White House insider book that portrays him as an unstable dolt surrounded by aides who uniformly think he’s unqualified to be president, an angry Donald Trump, reading from a prepared statement, threatened Wednesday to “take a strong look” at U.S. libel laws.

“Our current libel laws are a sham and a disgrace,” he added, “and do not represent American values or American fairness. So we’re going to take a strong look at that.”

Trump didn’t mention Michael’s Wolff’s new book, “Fire and Fury,” by name, but there’s no doubt the tell-all book continues to roil the White House and Trump personally.

The book set off a cascading string of events, part of which culminated with former Trump strategist Steve Bannon, who was widely quoted in the book, getting booted from his white nationalist perch at Breitbart.

Trump’s proud authoritarian streak of wanting to control and hinder a free press in America when it doesn’t produce what’s deemed to be favorable coverage is one reason the Committee to Protect Journalists just this week announced that Trump was a winner of its “Press Oppressor” awards.

 

Photo by archer10 (Dennis) / CC BY-SA 2.0

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For months, one postal worker had been doing all she could to protect herself from COVID-19. She wore a mask long before it was required at her plant in St. Paul, Minnesota. She avoided the lunch room, where she saw little social distancing, and ate in her car.

The stakes felt especially high. Her husband, a postal worker in the same facility, was at high risk because his immune system is compromised by a condition unrelated to the coronavirus. And the 20-year veteran of the U.S. Postal Service knew that her job, operating a machine that sorts mail by ZIP code, would be vital to processing the flood of mail-in ballots expected this fall.

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