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National Memo Editor-in-Chief Joe Conason appeared on MSNBC’s “PoliticsNation” last night alongside host Al Sharpton and The Washington Post’s Nia-Malika Henderson to discuss President Obama’s announcement that he will push to extend Bush tax cuts for those earning less than $250,000 a year, while letting the wealthiest Americans’ tax cuts expire. While Sharpton recalled the Clinton era, when the former president raised taxes on the wealthy to nearly 40 percent — which created 20.8 million private sector jobs — Conason noted that Sharpton left something out: “When President Clinton came into office, we had what was then considered a huge deficit,” and after Clinton proposed a tax increase, “The Republicans screamed, as you recall. Not one Republican vote…they all said… this will cause a recession, depression, worse. And we know what actually happened.” What happened wasn’t a recession or a depression, but instead, a historic economic surplus.

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On the contrary, the Bush era brought about a tax cut to 35 percent, a loss of 663,000 jobs, and a national debt of $4.9 trillion. Romney and the Republicans are proposing even more extensive tax cuts for the wealthy — haven’t they learned from history? 

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons, a novel and a memoir. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Participants hold placards as they mark Martin Luther King Jr. Day in Washington D.C. on January 17, 2022

Washington (AFP) - Members of Martin Luther King Jr's family joined marchers Monday in Washington urging Congress to pass voting rights reform as the United States marked the holiday commemorating the slain civil rights leader.

King's son Martin Luther King III spoke at the march, warning that many states "have passed laws that make it harder to vote" more than half a century after the activism of his father.

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