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In 1994,  Mitt Romney — running against Ted Kennedy for Senator in Massachusetts — chastised his Democratic opponent for raising $10 million. “To get that kind of money, you’ve got to cozy up, as an incumbent, to all of the special interest groups,” Romney insisted, “and that kind of relationship has an influence on the way you’re going to vote.”

The younger Romney strongly disliked political action committees. He thought all PACs should be abolished. “The kinds of demands that are being placed on the economics of running a campaign suggest an increasing power on the part of moneyed interests, and I think it’s wrong and we’ve got to change it,” he said.

Flash forward to 2012: So far, Romney has raised about $250 million, much of it bundled by lobbyists (and others whose names he won’t reveal) — not counting tens of millions donated to the SuperPACs that support him.  While he thought that $10 million was a big deal in 1994, last month Romney received $10 million in a single donation from embattled casino mogul Sheldon Adelson. That contribution went to his Super PAC, which has spent a total of $53 million to this point.

If Romney was right in 1994 to worry that a candidate’s relationship with “moneyed interests” will affects the way he governs, then present day Romney can be expected to cater to Adelson, the Koch brothers, the lobbyists who filled his warchest, and all those unnamed bundlers.

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Former Seminole County Tax Collector Joel Greenberg during an interview at his office in Lake Mary, Florida

Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/Orlando Sentinel/TNS

ORLANDO, Fla. – Joel Greenberg, Seminole County’s disgraced former tax collector, has agreed to plead guilty to six federal crimes — including sex trafficking of a child — in a deal that calls for him to cooperate with federal investigators, according to a source with knowledge of the agreement. The deal, which will be made official during a Monday morning court hearing Greenberg is required to attend, marks a turning point in the sprawling federal investigation that has roiled Florida politics and reportedly taken aim at Greenberg’s friend and ally U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz. In addition to traffic...

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