The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Senator David Vitter (R-LA) grabbed headlines in the run-up to the recent government shutdown by trying to deny his own staff health insurance coverage as a scalp Republicans could claim in exchange for keeping the government open.

Simply put: The so-called “Vitter Amendment” would take away health-care subsidies for congressional staffers who were forced into the Affordable Care Act exchanges by Republicans eager to oblige Congress to “go on Obamacare.” The effect would either be a huge pay cut or a lot of uninsured staffers, all so the senator from Louisiana could make a point.

Vitter is famous for admitting to visiting prostitutes, then being re-elected. So you could say that he doesn’t have a big problem screwing people who work for him.

On CNN’s Crossfire this week, the senator was called out by host Van Jones for a disconcerting lack of concern for the uninsured, except when he can opportunely use cancellation notices to attack the president’s health care law.

Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) then followed up with a tour de force of righteous anger over Vitter’s opposition to Obamacare and his state’s unwillingness to expand Medicaid to the 200,000 estimated Louisanians who are eligible:

“…20 percent of your people are living in poverty, about 20 percent of the people in Louisiana have no health insurance at all, and when you vote against the Affordable Care Act, what you’re telling those people is that they are not going to get health insurance. As you well know, your state — I gather you — has rejected that Medicaid should be expanded, and other Republican governors have done the same. So, it seems to me, that when you have people who are working really hard and trying to make a living, who desperately need health insurance, and when the Affordable Care Act said that we are going to expand Medicaid, you and others are saying ‘No, no, no, it’s okay for over 200,000 people in Louisiana not to take it,’ and I think that’s wrong!

David Vitter and Bernie Sanders

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

From left Ethan Crumbley and his parents Jennifer and James Crumbley

Mug shot photos from Oakland County via Dallas Express

After the 2012 massacre at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, then-Rep. Mike Rogers, a Michigan Republican, evaded calls for banning weapons of war. But he had other ideas. The "more realistic discussion," Rogers said, is "how do we target people with mental illness who use firearms?"

Tightening the gun laws would seem a lot easier and less intrusive than psychoanalyzing everyone with access to a weapon. But to address Rogers' point following the recent mass murder at a suburban Detroit high school, the question might be, "How do we with target the adults who hand powerful firearms to children with mental illness?"

Keep reading... Show less

Gen. Charles Flynn

Reprinted with permission from DailyKos

A former D.C. National Guard official blasted the Pentagon inspector general’s report on the military’s response to the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol and directly accused two top generals of lying about their role in the delays deploying the National Guard that day. Previously, the former commander of the D.C. National Guard—who now serves as the House sergeant-at-arms—had called for the retraction of the same inspector general’s report.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}